Softball College Scouting Reports


Scouting Reports

The RecruitLook staff has worked with thousands of recruits on getting them into the collegiate ranks.  The RecruitLook staff has also worked with and spoken to many college coaches to formulate the Scouting Report information provided in this section.  The information listed is not the determining factor on which college coaches will recruit you.  This is solely a guide to help you understand the data and information RecruitLook has gathered.

Pitchers

Softball recruiting guidelines for a high school recruit looking to be a college softball pitcher.

Division 1 High Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-Club : 5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

-High School : 3-4 year varsity experience with at least 2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best pitchers in your area and state.

Measurables

-Height : 5’9” or taller
-Velocity : 60-64+ mph
-Spin : 24+
-Pitches : fastball, changeup, curve, slider, screwball.  You’ll have at least 2 dominant pitches with 2 or 3 secondary pitches.

Statistics

Statistics (for a high school season):

W/L Record : 8-2 or around this range
Strikeouts :  6-9 strikeouts per game
ERA : 0.00-2.50
Walks : 1-2 walks per game
WHIP : 0.00-1.25 walks+hits per innings pitched

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division 1 pitchers are some of the most talented players in the country.  Recruiting publications might be doing feature articles on these types of players, and college coaches are recruiting them at a young age.

A D1 talent might develop later in high school, but most times they are getting recruiting attention by the time they are in the 9th grade.  If D1 college coaches are speaking with your legal guardians and following you around on the travel circuit, then you are getting recruited to play division one softball.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D1 pitcher are: Is she the best pitcher on her team and in the area?  Can she pitch out of trouble situations?  How does she handle pressure?  Does she have multiple strikeout pitches?  Can they field their position?  Is she overpowering opponents at the plate?

Coaches love 5’10” or taller on D1 pitchers.  You’ll get some looks just based off your height.  You can be smaller and still pitch D1, but you better have an attribute that the college coach will like: i.e. an overpowering fastball.

Division 1 Mid/Low Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

Measurables

Statistics

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division 2

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

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Measurables

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Statistics

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RecruitLook Scouting Report

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Division 3 / NAIA

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

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Measurables

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Statistics

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RecruitLook Scouting Report

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Junior College

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

Measurables

Statistics

RecruitLook Scouting Report

More scouting information for pitchers:

Most college coaches are concerned with:
-Vertical/horizontal movement of pitches.
-Command & control placement of pitches (Hitting spots and corners are crucial)
-Off-Speed pitches:  Fastball 60, changeup 1 is at 50 and changeup 2 at 40. Coaches like to vary speeds to keep hitters’ timing off.
-Does she play defense from the circle?
-What type of pitcher is she:  speed/power
-Thumber : Spins well… vertical/horizontal mover gets a lot of routine outs because ground balls and pop flies.
-How is her composure on the mound.
-Late-breaking pitches : keeps the eye level of the hitter always guessing.
-Some coaches want to know if the pitcher can hit for herself.  If just a pitcher, then not much to offer a coach.
-LEFTIES are huge in the recruiting game.

Catchers

Softball recruiting guidelines for a high school recruit looking to be a college softball catcher.

Division 1 High Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  3-4 year varsity experience with at least 2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best catchers in your area and state.

Club:  5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

Measurables

Height: 5’7” or taller

Pop Time:  1.7 seconds

Home to 1B:  2.7 seconds

Overhand Arm Strength:  62-65 MPH.  65+ is most sought after.

Statistics

Statistics (for a high school season):

Batting Avg:  .300 or higher

Home Runs:  1+

RBIs:  10+

Fielding %:  .990+

Caught Stealing %:  40% or higher

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division 1 catchers are some of the most talented players in the country.  Recruiting publications might be doing feature articles on these types of players, and college coaches are recruiting them at a young age.

A D1 talent might develop later in high school, but most times they are getting recruiting attention by the time they are in the 9th grade.  If D1 college coaches are speaking with your legal guardians and following you around on the travel circuit, then you are getting recruited to play division one softball.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D1 catcher are:  How does she handle the pitching staff?  Can she slow down the running game?  Can she throw behind base runners?  How accurate is she on her throws to second and third?  How does she handle pitches in the dirt?  Does she allow a lot of passed balls?  Is she good at framing pitches?  Does she hit for contact or power?  Is she a vocal leader on the field? 

Most Division 1 catchers are exceptional with the glove and the bat.  College coaches really like a tall catcher, so 5’10” or taller is going to get D1 attention.

Division 1 Mid/Low Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  3-4 year varsity experience with at least 2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best catchers in your area.

Club:  4-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

Measurables

Height:  5’7” or taller

Pop Time:  1.75 seconds

Home to 1B:  2.8 seconds

Overhand Arm Strength:  60-62 MPH

Statistics

Batting Avg:  .300 or higher

Home Runs:  1+

RBIs:  10+

Fielding %:  .985+

Caught Stealing %:  37%-40% or higher

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division 1 catchers are some of the most talented players in the country.  Recruiting publications might be doing feature articles on these types of players, and college coaches are recruiting them at a young age.

A D1 talent might develop later in high school, but most times they are getting recruiting attention by the time they are in the 9th grade.  If D1 college coaches are speaking with your legal guardians and following you around on the travel circuit, then you are getting recruited to play division one softball.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D1 catcher are:  How does she handle the pitching staff?  Can she slow down the running game?  Can she throw behind base runners?  How accurate is she on her throws to second and third?  How does she handle pitches in the dirt?  Does she allow a lot of passed balls?  Is she good at framing pitches?  Does she hit for contact or power?  Is she a vocal leader on the field? 

You might fall into the Mid/Low major tier if you are getting a few nibbles from top college programs but no offers.  Most of the time what separates a High major catcher from Mid/Low major catcher is that the High major recruit excels in both hitting and fielding.  The Mid/Low tend to be exceptional in one category and above average in the other.

Division 2

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  2-3 year varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best catchers in your conference.

Club:  3-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

Measurables

Height: 5’5” or taller

Pop Time:  1.8 seconds

Home to 1B:  3.1 seconds

Overhand Arm Strength:  55-60 MPH

Statistics

Batting Avg:  .285 or higher

Home Runs:  1+

RBIs:  8+

Fielding %:  .975+

Caught Stealing %:  34%-37% or higher

RecruitLook Scouting Report

You’ll be getting more of your recruiting attention later in your high school career.  You’ll have to work harder at getting recruiting attention.  It will be critical for you to build a large network of college coaches that you are talking with, that way you can invite them to all your travel ball tournaments.  You will also be targeting several college camps and showcase events for more recruiting exposure.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D2 catcher are:  How does she handle the pitching staff?  Can she slow down the running game?  Can she throw behind base runners?  How accurate is she on her throws to second and third?  How does she handle pitches in the dirt?  Does she allow a lot of passed balls?  Is she good at framing pitches?  Does she hit for contact or power?  Is she a vocal leader on the field? 

Division 3 / NAIA

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  2-3 year varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best catchers in your conference.

Club:  3-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to different tournaments in your region.

Measurables

Height: 5’4” or taller

Pop Time:  2.1 seconds

Home to 1B:  3.3 seconds

Overhand Arm Strength:  50-55 MPH

Statistics

Batting Avg:  .270 or higher

Home Runs:  1+

RBIs:  5+

Fielding %:  .970+

Caught Stealing %:  30%-35% or higher

RecruitLook Scouting Report

You’ll be getting more of your recruiting attention later in your high school career.  You’ll have to work harder at getting recruiting attention.  It will be critical for you to build a large network of college coaches that you are talking with, that way you can invite them to all your travel ball tournaments.  You will also be targeting several college camps and showcase events for more recruiting exposure.

You might be focused more on academics, as NAIA & D3 schools offer some of the best academic opportunities in the country.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D3/NAIA catcher are:  How does she handle the pitching staff?  Can she slow down the running game?  Can she throw behind base runners?  How accurate is she on her throws to second and third?  How does she handle pitches in the dirt?  Does she allow a lot of passed balls?  Is she good at framing pitches?  Does she hit for contact or power?  Is she a vocal leader on the field? 

Junior College

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  1-3 year varsity experience with at least 1 year of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best catchers in your conference.

Club:  1-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to different tournaments in your region.

Measurables

Height: 5’4” or taller

Pop Time:  2.1 seconds

Home to 1B:  3.3 seconds

Overhand Arm Strength:  TBD

Statistics

Batting Avg:  .250 or higher

Home Runs:  1+

RBIs:  5+

Fielding %:  .960+

Caught Stealing %:  30%-35% or higher

RecruitLook Scouting Report

The Junior College route is a good option for recruits that is often overlooked by recruits.  It is difficult to pinpoint exactly what college coaches look for in stats and measurables at the JUCO level; because, they are recruiting players that might not fit at a higher level due to a few intangibles.

Things that will steer recruits towards the JUCO level:  A recruit that can’t qualify academically for division 1 or division 2 will need to go JUCO in order to qualify at a higher level in two years.  The recruit is an exceptional player but is missing something that limits them…for example:

-Not tall enough for D1 so must prove they can compete at the JUCO level first. 

-Needs to work on certain pitches to become a more all-around pitcher.

Don’t look at the JUCO route negatively.  You should look at it as an opportunity to prove yourself against better competition than high school ball has to offer.  A lot of recruits go on to have successful college careers after they complete two years at the JUCO level.

Middle Infielders

Softball recruiting guidelines for a high school recruit looking to be a college softball middle infielder.

Division 1 High Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  3-4 year varsity experience with at least 2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best middle infielders in your area and state.

Club:  5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

Measurables

Height: 5’6” or taller

Home to 1B:  2.8 or lower

Statistics

Statistics (for a high school season):

Batting Avg.: .300+

Home Runs: 1+

RBIs: 10+

Stolen Bases: 5-7

Fielding %: .990+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division 1 middle infielders are some of the most talented players in the country.  Recruiting publications might be doing feature articles on these types of players, and college coaches are recruiting them at a young age.

A D1 talent might develop later in high school, but most times they are getting recruiting attention by the time they are in the 9th grade.  If D1 college coaches are speaking with your legal guardians and following you around on the travel circuit, then you are getting recruited to play division one softball.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D1 middle infielders are:  How does she turn the double play?  Does she have good footwork and glove work in the field?  Is she good at getting on base as hitter?  Can she sacrifice runners?  Does she provide speed in the lineup?  Is she a threat on the base paths?

Division 1 Mid/Low Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  2-4 year varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best middle infielders on your team and in the area.

Club:  4-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

Measurables

Height: 5’5” or taller

Home to 1B: 2.9 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.: .290+

Home Runs: 1+

RBIs: 9+

Stolen Bases: 4-6

Fielding %: .985+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division 1 middle infielders are some of the most talented players in the country.  Recruiting publications might be doing feature articles on these types of players, and college coaches are recruiting them at a young age.

A D1 talent might develop later in high school, but most times they are getting recruiting attention by the time they are in the 9th grade.  If D1 college coaches are speaking with your legal guardians and following you around on the travel circuit, then you are getting recruited to play division one softball.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D1 middle infielders are:  How does she turn the double play?  Does she have good footwork and glove work in the field?  Is she good at getting on base as hitter?  Can she sacrifice runners?  Does she provide speed in the lineup?  Is she a threat on the base paths?

You might fall into the Mid/Low major tier if you are getting a few nibbles from top college programs but no offers.  Most of the time what separates a High major catcher from Mid/Low major catcher is that the High major recruit excels in both hitting and fielding.  The Mid/Low tend to be exceptional in one category and above average in the other.

Division 2

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  2-3 year varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best middle infielders in your conference.

Club:  3-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

Measurables

Height: 5’4” or taller

Home to 1B: 3.1 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.: .280+

Home Runs: 1+

RBIs: 7+

Stolen Bases: 3-5

Fielding %: .980+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

You’ll be getting more of your recruiting attention later in your high school career.  You’ll have to work harder at getting recruiting attention.  It will be critical for you to build a large network of college coaches that you are talking with, that way you can invite them to all your travel ball tournaments.  You will also be targeting several college camps and showcase events for more recruiting exposure.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D2 middle infielders are:  How does she turn the double play?  Does she have good footwork and glove work in the field?  Is she good at getting on base as hitter?  Can she sacrifice runners?  Does she provide speed in the lineup?  Is she a threat on the base paths?

Division 3 / NAIA

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  1-2 years varsity experience with at least 1 year of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best pitchers on your team.

Club:  1-3+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to different tournaments in your region.

Measurables

Height: 5’3” or taller

Home to 1B: 3.3 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.: .270+

Home Runs: 0-1

RBIs: 5+

Stolen Bases: 2-4

Fielding %: .970+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

You’ll be getting more of your recruiting attention later in your high school career.  You’ll have to work harder at getting recruiting attention.  It will be critical for you to build a large network of college coaches that you are talking with, that way you can invite them to all your travel ball tournaments.  You will also be targeting several college camps and showcase events for more recruiting exposure.

You might be focused more on academics, as NAIA & D3 schools offer some of the best academic opportunities in the country.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D3/NAIA middle infielders are:  How does she turn the double play?  Does she have good footwork and glove work in the field?  Is she good at getting on base as hitter?  Can she sacrifice runners?  Does she provide speed in the lineup?  Is she a threat on the base paths?

Junior College

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  1-3 years varsity experience with at least 1 year of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best middle infielders on your team.

Club:  1-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to different tournaments in your region.

Measurables

Height: 5’3” or taller

Home to 1B: 3.3 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.: .270+

Home Runs: 0-1

RBIs: 5+

Stolen Bases: 2-4

Fielding %: .970+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

The Junior College route is a good option for recruits that is often overlooked by recruits.  It is difficult to pinpoint exactly what college coaches look for in stats and measurables at the JUCO level; because, they are recruiting players that might not fit at a higher level due to a few intangibles.

Things that will steer recruits towards the JUCO level:  A recruit that can’t qualify academically for division 1 or division 2 will need to go JUCO in order to qualify at a higher level in two years.  The recruit is an exceptional player but is missing something that limits them…for example:

-Not tall enough for D1 so must prove they can compete at the JUCO level first. 

-Needs to work on certain pitches to become a more all-around pitcher.

Don’t look at the JUCO route negatively.  You should look at it as an opportunity to prove yourself against better competition than high school ball has to offer.  A lot of recruits go on to have successful college careers after they complete two years at the JUCO level.

More scouting information for middle infielders:

Size:  Varies from program to program but not a huge factor.  Usually softball players are recruited based on athleticism and put in positions elsewhere in college.

ShortStop
-Need to have an “attack the ball” mentality.
-Superior athleticism to cover more ground.
-Arm strength is HUGE, overhand exactly same as 3B.
-Most be accurate with throws.
-Good baserunner.
-Good bat that can get on base.
-Can play other positions.

Second Base
-Hustler.
-Has a great glove and can cover the middle well.
-Quick on feet to cover from 1B to 4/5 hole if needed.

Hitting
Most common coaching philosophies are:
-Love power hitters and the deep ball.
-Love slappers and speed.
-Gap hitters.
-Bat speed.
-Ball exit speed: 65+ is great, 60-65 is good, 55-59 isn’t bad 50-54 low power.

Slappers
-Speed is king.
-Can they hit as well?  BONUS if they can.
-Can they soft slap? Power slap? Drag Bunt?

Bunters
-Can they read the INF?
-Can they one hand drag bunt?

Corner Infielder

Softball recruiting guidelines for a high school recruit looking to be a college softball corner infielder.

Division 1 High Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-Club : 5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

-High School : 3-4 year varsity experience with at least 2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best corner infielders in your area and state.

Measurables

Height:  5’8” or taller

Home to 1B:  2.9 or lower

Statistics

Statistics (for a high school season):

Batting Avg.:  .320+

Home Runs:  2+

RBIs:  20+

On-Base %:  .400+

Fielding %:  .990+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division 1 corner infielders are some of the most talented players in the country.  Recruiting publications might be doing feature articles on these types of players, and college coaches are recruiting them at a young age.

A D1 talent might develop later in high school, but most times they are getting recruiting attention by the time they are in the 9th grade.  If D1 college coaches are speaking with your legal guardians and following you around on the travel circuit, then you are getting recruited to play division one softball.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D1 corner infielders are:  Is she a run producer at the plate?  Can she drive the ball into the gaps?  Is she a station-to-station runner, or can she take an extra base when needed?  Is she a contact or power hitter?  Can she produce with runners in scoring position?  Is she good at holding runners on?  Can she make the throw from 3B to 1B?  Is she a liability in the field?

Division 1 Mid/Low Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  2-4 year varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best corner infielders on your team and in the area.

Club:  4-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

Measurables

Height:  5’7” or taller

Home to 1B:  2.9 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.:  .310+

Home Runs:  2+

RBIs:  18+

On-Base %:  .390+

Fielding %:  .985+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division 1 corner infielders are some of the most talented players in the country.  Recruiting publications might be doing feature articles on these types of players, and college coaches are recruiting them at a young age.

A D1 talent might develop later in high school, but most times they are getting recruiting attention by the time they are in the 9th grade.  If D1 college coaches are speaking with your legal guardians and following you around on the travel circuit, then you are getting recruited to play division one softball.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D1 corner infielders are:  Is she a run producer at the plate?  Can she drive the ball into the gaps?  Is she a station-to-station runner, or can she take an extra base when needed?  Is she a contact or power hitter?  Can she produce with runners in scoring position?  Is she good at holding runners on?  Can she make the throw from 3B to 1B?  Is she a liability in the field?

You might fall into the Mid/Low major tier if you are getting a few nibbles from top college programs but no offers.  Most of the time what separates a High major catcher from Mid/Low major catcher is that the High major recruit excels in both hitting and fielding.  The Mid/Low tend to be exceptional in one category and above average in the other.

Division 2

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  2-3 year varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best corner infielders in your conference.

Club:  3-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

Measurables

Height:  5’6” or taller

Home to 1B:  3.0 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.:  .300+

Home Runs: 1+

RBIs: 15+

On-Base %:  .380+

Fielding %:  .980+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

You’ll be getting more of your recruiting attention later in your high school career.  You’ll have to work harder at getting recruiting attention.  It will be critical for you to build a large network of college coaches that you are talking with, that way you can invite them to all your travel ball tournaments.  You will also be targeting several college camps and showcase events for more recruiting exposure.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D2 corner infielders are:  Is she a run producer at the plate?  Can she drive the ball into the gaps?  Is she a station-to-station runner, or can she take an extra base when needed?  Is she a contact or power hitter?  Can she produce with runners in scoring position?  Is she good at holding runners on?  Can she make the throw from 3B to 1B?  Is she a liability in the field?

Division 3 / NAIA

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  1-2 years varsity experience with at least 1 year of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best pitchers on your team.

Club:  1-3+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to different tournaments in your region.

Measurables

Height:  5’5” or taller

Home to 1B:  3.2 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.:  .280+

Home Runs: 1+

RBIs: 12+

On-Base %:  .360+

Fielding %:  .970+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

You’ll be getting more of your recruiting attention later in your high school career.  You’ll have to work harder at getting recruiting attention.  It will be critical for you to build a large network of college coaches that you are talking with, that way you can invite them to all your travel ball tournaments.  You will also be targeting several college camps and showcase events for more recruiting exposure.

You might be focused more on academics, as NAIA & D3 schools offer some of the best academic opportunities in the country.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D3/NAIA corner infielders are:  Is she a run producer at the plate?  Can she drive the ball into the gaps?  Is she a station-to-station runner, or can she take an extra base when needed?  Is she a contact or power hitter?  Can she produce with runners in scoring position?  Is she good at holding runners on?  Can she make the throw from 3B to 1B?  Is she a liability in the field?

Junior College

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  1-3 years varsity experience with at least 1 year of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best middle infielders on your team.

Club:  1-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to different tournaments in your region.

Measurables

Height:  5’5” or taller

Home to 1B:  3.2 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.:  .270+

Home Runs: 1+

RBIs: 10+

On-Base %:  .360+

Fielding %:  .970+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

The Junior College route is a good option for recruits that is often overlooked by recruits.  It is difficult to pinpoint exactly what college coaches look for in stats and measurables at the JUCO level; because, they are recruiting players that might not fit at a higher level due to a few intangibles.

Things that will steer recruits towards the JUCO level:  A recruit that can’t qualify academically for division 1 or division 2 will need to go JUCO in order to qualify at a higher level in two years.  The recruit is an exceptional player but is missing something that limits them…for example:

-Not tall enough for D1 so must prove they can compete at the JUCO level first. 

-Needs to work on certain pitches to become a more all-around pitcher.

Don’t look at the JUCO route negatively.  You should look at it as an opportunity to prove yourself against better competition than high school ball has to offer.  A lot of recruits go on to have successful college careers after they complete two years at the JUCO level.

More scouting information for corner infielders:

First Base
-Size is king and lefties are a plus!
-Coaches prefer a power hitter.
-Stretch is important.
-Can they dig out ball in the dirt?
-Can they reach balls thrown high?

Third Base
-Can they move laterally towards SS.
-How is their athleticism?
-Overhand throwing speed is most important.
-Foot speed and ability to quickly move front/back and laterally.
-Typically a big stick or slapper that throws right but bats left.
-Accuracy of throws to 1B.

Hitting
Most common coaching philosophies are:
-Love power hitters and the deep ball.
-Love slappers and speed.
-Gap hitters.
-Bat speed.
-Ball exit speed: 65+ is great, 60-65 is good, 55-59 isn’t bad 50-54 low power.

Slappers
-Speed is king.
-Can they hit as well?  BONUS if they can.
-Can they soft slap? Power slap? Drag Bunt?

Bunters
-Can they read the INF?
-Can they one hand drag bunt?

Centerfielder

Softball recruiting guidelines for a high school recruit looking to be a college softball centerfielder.

Division 1 High Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  3-4 year varsity experience with at least 2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best center fielders in your area and state.

Club:  5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

Measurables

Height:  5’7” or taller

Home to 1B:  2.8 or lower

Statistics

Statistics (for a high school season):

Batting Avg.:  .330+

Home Runs: 2+

RBIs: 14+

Runs Scored: 18+

Stolen Bases: 5-7

On-Base %:  .450+

Fielding %:  .990+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division 1 centerfielders are some of the most talented players in the country.  Recruiting publications might be doing feature articles on these types of players, and college coaches are recruiting them at a young age.

A D1 talent might develop later in high school, but most times they are getting recruiting attention by the time they are in the 9th grade.  If D1 college coaches are speaking with your legal guardians and following you around on the travel circuit, then you are getting recruited to play division one softball.

Centerfielders are most typically going to be the most athletic and all-around softball player on the team.  They’ll be a good combination of power and speed.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D1 centerfielders are:  Is she power hitter, contact hitter, or both?  Can she handle the bat: bunting, hitting to the opposite field, driving it to the gaps?  Can she stretch a single into a double?  Does she have a low strikeout rate?  Can she steal bases?  Does she command the outfield?  Can she track fly balls hit into the gaps?  Does she have a good arm to 2B and to home plate from the outfield?  Can she direct the corner outfielders on defensive alignments?  How well does she read fly balls right after contact?

Division 1 Mid/Low Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  2-4 year varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best centerfielders on your team and in the area.

Club:  4-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

Measurables

Height:  5’7” or taller

Home to 1B:  2.8 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.:  .320+

Home Runs: 2+

RBIs: 12+

Runs Scored: 16+

Stolen Bases: 4-6

On-Base %:  .430+

Fielding %:  .985+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division 1 centerfielders are some of the most talented players in the country.  Recruiting publications might be doing feature articles on these types of players, and college coaches are recruiting them at a young age.

A D1 talent might develop later in high school, but most times they are getting recruiting attention by the time they are in the 9th grade.  If D1 college coaches are speaking with your legal guardians and following you around on the travel circuit, then you are getting recruited to play division one softball.

Centerfielders are most typically going to be the most athletic and all-around softball player on the team.  They’ll be a good combination of power and speed.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D1 centerfielders are:  Is she power hitter, contact hitter, or both?  Can she handle the bat: bunting, hitting to the opposite field, driving it to the gaps?  Can she stretch a single into a double?  Does she have a low strikeout rate?  Can she steal bases?  Does she command the outfield?  Can she track fly balls hit into the gaps?  Does she have a good arm to 2B and to home plate from the outfield?  Can she direct the corner outfielders on defensive alignments?  How well does she read fly balls right after contact?

You might fall into the Mid/Low major tier if you are getting a few nibbles from top college programs but no offers.  Most of the time what separates a High major corner outfielder from Mid/Low major corner outfielder is that the High major recruit excels in both hitting and fielding.  The Mid/Low tend to be exceptional in one category and above average in the other.

Division 2

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  2-3 year varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best centerfielders in your conference.

Club:  3-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

Measurables

Height:  5’6” or taller

Home to 1B:  2.9 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.:  .310+

Home Runs: 1+

RBIs: 10+

Runs Scored: 14+

Stolen Bases: 3-5

On-Base %:  .410+

Fielding %:  .980+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

You’ll be getting more of your recruiting attention later in your high school career.  You’ll have to work harder at getting recruiting attention.  It will be critical for you to build a large network of college coaches that you are talking with, that way you can invite them to all your travel ball tournaments.  You will also be targeting several college camps and showcase events for more recruiting exposure.

Centerfielders are most typically going to be the most athletic and all-around softball player on the team.  They’ll be a good combination of power and speed.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D1 centerfielders are:  Is she power hitter, contact hitter, or both?  Can she handle the bat: bunting, hitting to the opposite field, driving it to the gaps?  Can she stretch a single into a double?  Does she have a low strikeout rate?  Can she steal bases?  Does she command the outfield?  Can she track fly balls hit into the gaps?  Does she have a good arm to 2B and to home plate from the outfield?  Can she direct the corner outfielders on defensive alignments?  How well does she read fly balls right after contact?

Division 3 / NAIA

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  1-2 years varsity experience with at least 1 year of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best centerfielders on your team.

Club:  1-3+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to different tournaments in your region.

Measurables

Height:  5’4” or taller

Home to 1B:  3.1 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.:  .300+

Home Runs: 0-1+

RBIs: 8+

Runs Scored: 12+

Stolen Bases: 2-4

On-Base %:  .390+

Fielding %:  .970+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

You’ll be getting more of your recruiting attention later in your high school career.  You’ll have to work harder at getting recruiting attention.  It will be critical for you to build a large network of college coaches that you are talking with, that way you can invite them to all your travel ball tournaments.  You will also be targeting several college camps and showcase events for more recruiting exposure.

You might be focused more on academics, as NAIA & D3 schools offer some of the best academic opportunities in the country.

Centerfielders are most typically going to be the most athletic and all-around softball player on the team.  They’ll be a good combination of power and speed.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D1 centerfielders are:  Is she power hitter, contact hitter, or both?  Can she handle the bat: bunting, hitting to the opposite field, driving it to the gaps?  Can she stretch a single into a double?  Does she have a low strikeout rate?  Can she steal bases?  Does she command the outfield?  Can she track fly balls hit into the gaps?  Does she have a good arm to 2B and to home plate from the outfield?  Can she direct the corner outfielders on defensive alignments?  How well does she read fly balls right after contact?

Junior College

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  1-3 years varsity experience with at least 1 year of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best centerfielders on your team.

Club:  1-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to different tournaments in your region.

Measurables

Height:  5’4” or taller

Home to 1B:  3.2 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.: .280+

Home Runs: 0-1+

RBIs: 8+

Runs Scored: 10+

Stolen Bases: 2-3

On-Base %:  .375+

Fielding %:  .970+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

The Junior College route is a good option for recruits that is often overlooked by recruits.  It is difficult to pinpoint exactly what college coaches look for in stats and measurables at the JUCO level; because, they are recruiting players that might not fit at a higher level due to a few intangibles.

Things that will steer recruits towards the JUCO level:  A recruit that can’t qualify academically for division 1 or division 2 will need to go JUCO in order to qualify at a higher level in two years.  The recruit is an exceptional player but is missing something that limits them…for example:

-Not tall enough for D1 so must prove they can compete at the JUCO level first. 

-Needs to work on certain pitches to become a more all-around pitcher.

Don’t look at the JUCO route negatively.  You should look at it as an opportunity to prove yourself against better competition than high school ball has to offer.  A lot of recruits go on to have successful college careers after they complete two years at the JUCO level.

More scouting information for centerfielders:

Outfielders
-Height not as important in most cases.  Tall outfielders are desired by some coaches, but not all.
-Coaches want fast, so a 5’1 kid is recruitable if she is running a 2.65 home to first.
-Coaches like power and recruits that can play all 3 positions.

Hitting
Most common coaching philosophies are:
-Love power hitters and the deep ball.
-Love slappers and speed.
-Gap hitters.
-Bat speed.
-Ball exit speed: 65+ is great, 60-65 is good, 55-59 isn’t bad 50-54 low power.

Slappers
-Speed is king.
-Can they hit as well?  BONUS if they can.
-Can they soft slap? Power slap? Drag Bunt?

Bunters
-Can they read the INF?
-Can they one hand drag bunt?

Corner Outfielder

Softball recruiting guidelines for a high school recruit looking to be a college softball corner outfielder.

Division 1 High Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  3-4 year varsity experience with at least 2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best corner outfielders in your area and state.

Club:  5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

Measurables

Height: 5’8” or taller

Home to 1B: 2.9 or lower

Statistics

Statistics (for a high school season):

Batting Avg.: .310+

Home Runs: 2+

RBIs: 18-20+

Stolen Bases: 4-5

On-Base %: .400+

Fielding %: .990+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division 1 corner outfielders are some of the most talented players in the country.  Recruiting publications might be doing feature articles on these types of players, and college coaches are recruiting them at a young age.

A D1 talent might develop later in high school, but most times they are getting recruiting attention by the time they are in the 9th grade.  If D1 college coaches are speaking with your legal guardians and following you around on the travel circuit, then you are getting recruited to play division one softball.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D1 corner outfielders are:  Is she a run producer at the plate?  Can she drive the ball into the gaps?  Is she a station-to-station runner, or can she take an extra base when needed?  Is she a base stealer?  Is she a contact or power hitter?  Can she produce with runners in scoring position?  Can she track fly balls that are hit in the alleys?  What is her arm strength from the warning track to 2B & warning track to home plate?  How well does she read fly balls right after contact?

Division 1 Mid/Low Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  2-4 year varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best corner outfielders on your team and in the area.

Club:  4-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

Measurables

Height: 5’7” or taller

Home to 1B: 3.0 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.:  .300+

Home Runs: 2+

RBIs: 16-18+

Stolen Bases: 3-5

On-Base %:  .390+

Fielding %:  .985+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division 1 corner outfielders are some of the most talented players in the country.  Recruiting publications might be doing feature articles on these types of players, and college coaches are recruiting them at a young age.

A D1 talent might develop later in high school, but most times they are getting recruiting attention by the time they are in the 9th grade.  If D1 college coaches are speaking with your legal guardians and following you around on the travel circuit, then you are getting recruited to play division one softball.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D1 corner outfielders are:  Is she a run producer at the plate?  Can she drive the ball into the gaps?  Is she a station-to-station runner, or can she take an extra base when needed?  Is she a base stealer?  Is she a contact or power hitter?  Can she produce with runners in scoring position?  Can she track fly balls that are hit in the alleys?  What is her arm strength from the warning track to 2B & warning track to home plate?  How well does she read fly balls right after contact?

You might fall into the Mid/Low major tier if you are getting a few nibbles from top college programs but no offers.  Most of the time what separates a High major corner outfielder from Mid/Low major corner outfielder is that the High major recruit excels in both hitting and fielding.  The Mid/Low tend to be exceptional in one category and above average in the other.

Division 2

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  2-3 year varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best corner outfielders in your conference.

Club:  3-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to high profile tournaments across the country playing in front of college coaches.

Measurables

Height: 5’5” or taller

Home to 1B: 3.1 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.:  .290+

Home Runs: 1+

RBIs: 14+

Stolen Bases:  2-4

On-Base %:  .370+

Fielding %:  .980+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

You’ll be getting more of your recruiting attention later in your high school career.  You’ll have to work harder at getting recruiting attention.  It will be critical for you to build a large network of college coaches that you are talking with, that way you can invite them to all your travel ball tournaments.  You will also be targeting several college camps and showcase events for more recruiting exposure.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D2 corner outfielders are:  Is she a run producer at the plate?  Can she drive the ball into the gaps?  Is she a station-to-station runner, or can she take an extra base when needed?  Is she a base stealer?  Is she a contact or power hitter?  Can she produce with runners in scoring position?  Can she track fly balls that are hit in the alleys?  What is her arm strength from the warning track to 2B & warning track to home plate?  How well does she read fly balls right after contact?

Division 3 / NAIA

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  1-2 years varsity experience with at least 1 year of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the corner outfielders on your team.

Club:  1-3+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to different tournaments in your region.

Measurables

Height: 5’4” or taller

Home to 1B: 3.2 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.:  .280+
Home Runs: 1+
RBIs: 8+
Stolen Bases: 2-3
On-Base %:  .350+
Fielding %:  .970+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

You’ll be getting more of your recruiting attention later in your high school career.  You’ll have to work harder at getting recruiting attention.  It will be critical for you to build a large network of college coaches that you are talking with, that way you can invite them to all your travel ball tournaments.  You will also be targeting several college camps and showcase events for more recruiting exposure.

You might be focused more on academics, as NAIA & D3 schools offer some of the best academic opportunities in the country.

Every coach looks at different things when recruiting this level, but a few of the common things that they look for in a D3/NAIA corner outfielders are:  Is she a run producer at the plate?  Can she drive the ball into the gaps?  Is she a station-to-station runner, or can she take an extra base when needed?  Is she a base stealer?  Is she a contact or power hitter?  Can she produce with runners in scoring position?  Can she track fly balls that are hit in the alleys?  What is her arm strength from the warning track to 2B & warning track to home plate?  How well does she read fly balls right after contact?

Junior College

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  1-3 years varsity experience with at least 1 year of starting at the varsity level.  You’ll be one of the best corner outfielders on your team.

Club:  1-5+ years of club travel ball.  You play on a club team that travels to different tournaments in your region.

Measurables

Height: 5’4” or taller
Home to 1B: 3.2 or lower

Statistics

Batting Avg.: .270+

Home Runs: 1+

RBIs: 8+

Stolen Bases: 2+

On-Base %: .350+

Fielding %: .970+

RecruitLook Scouting Report

The Junior College route is a good option for recruits that is often overlooked by recruits.  It is difficult to pinpoint exactly what college coaches look for in stats and measurables at the JUCO level; because, they are recruiting players that might not fit at a higher level due to a few intangibles.

Things that will steer recruits towards the JUCO level:  A recruit that can’t qualify academically for division 1 or division 2 will need to go JUCO in order to qualify at a higher level in two years.  The recruit is an exceptional player but is missing something that limits them…for example:

-Not tall enough for D1 so must prove they can compete at the JUCO level first. 

-Needs to work on certain pitches to become a more all-around pitcher.

Don’t look at the JUCO route negatively.  You should look at it as an opportunity to prove yourself against better competition than high school ball has to offer.  A lot of recruits go on to have successful college careers after they complete two years at the JUCO level.

More scouting information for corner outfielder:

Outfielders
-Height not as important in most cases.  Tall outfielders are desired by some coaches, but not all.
-Coaches want fast, so a 5’1 kid is recruitable if she is running a 2.65 home to first.
-Coaches like power and recruits that can play all 3 positions.

Hitting
Most common coaching philosophies are:
-Love power hitters and the deep ball.
-Love slappers and speed.
-Gap hitters.
-Bat speed.
-Ball exit speed: 65+ is great, 60-65 is good, 55-59 isn’t bad 50-54 low power.

Slappers
-Speed is king.
-Can they hit as well?  BONUS if they can.
-Can they soft slap? Power slap? Drag Bunt?

Bunters
-Can they read the INF?
-Can they one hand drag bunt?