College Golf Scouting Reports


College Golf Scouting Reports

The RecruitLook staff has worked with thousands of recruits on getting them into the collegiate ranks.  The RecruitLook staff has also worked with and spoken to many college coaches to formulate the Scouting Report information provided in this section.  The information listed is not the determining factor on which college coaches will recruit you.  This is solely a guide to help you understand the data and information RecruitLook has gathered.

Men’s Golf

Men’s golf recruiting guidelines for a high school recruit looking to be a college golfer.

Division 1 High Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  3-4 year varsity experience with at least 2-3 years of being one of the top players on your team.

Junior Circuit:  playing year round since age of 8-9 years old.

Measurables

Scoring Average:  72 or lower
Handicap:  scratch or better
Status:  A top 3-4 player in your city/state
Wins/Finish:  Coaches look for number of wins, top 5, and top 10 finishes

Tournaments

Events:  National tournaments & Regional tournaments
# of Players:  competing in events with 100+ participants
Average Finish:  consistently top 10 finisher
Slope Rating:  120+
Course Yardage:  6400+

Tourney Setup:  36 or 54 hole events

RecruitLook Scouting Report

College coaches look for certain things when recruiting golfers.  Golf is an individual sport; therefore, it is easier for recruits to get noticed/recruited based on scores, handicap, and tournament finishes.  Below are some other items college scouts look for when recruiting golfers.

On the range:  coaches are watching very closely to evaluate technique and general athleticism. They also want to see how the player practices.  Are they serious, disciplined, and focused or are they using practice time to socialize?  Does the player pick specific targets, practice their pre-shot routine, and use alignment aids while they practice?  Golf is a sport the requires constant practice and self discipline, so college coaches look for recruits that will put the time in to become a better golfer.

On the golf course:  coaches are always interested to see how a player reacts to a tough situation.  How does the golfer handle a bad tee shot, missed putt, an iron shot that lands in the bunker, and any situation that could rattle the golfer.  Coaches want to see how a player handles adversity.

At the high level division one:  college coaches are recruiting the best of the best.  These recruits are long of the tee, accurate with their drives, have the ability to fade or draw the ball, can control their iron game, are very accurate from 150 yards and in, can get “up and down”, are really good around the green with their short game, are great putters, have good all-around golf game.

Course Management:  Coaches want to know and see how you think your way around the golf course.  Do you hit driver when you should’t be, do you think about best shot when in trouble and finally are you able to recover from a bad shot and still score

Finally, all coaches are interested to see how players act on the golf course and with their peers.  Is the golfer cussing and throwing clubs after bad shots?  Do they have a reputation for having poor golf adequate?  Are they friendly with other golfers? 

In the final analysis, score is not the only way to evaluate talent.  If this were the case, then coaches would stay at home and recruit via the results online.  Pay attention to how you present yourself and how you act at tournaments.

Division 1 Mid/Low Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  3-4 year varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of being one of the top players on your team.

Junior Circuit:  playing year round since age of 9 years old.

Measurables

Scoring Average:  74 or lower
Handicap: +2 to +4 range or better
Status:  A top 10 player in your city/state
Wins/Finish:  Coaches look for number of wins, top 5, and top 10 finishes

Tournaments

Events: National tournaments & Regional tournaments
# of Players:  competing in events with 100+ participants
Average Finish:  consistently top 15 finisher
Slope Rating:  120+
Course Yardage:  6400+
Tourney Setup:  36 or 54 hole events

RecruitLook Scouting Report

College coaches look for certain things when recruiting golfers.  Golf is an individual sport; therefore, it is easier for recruits to get noticed/recruited based on scores, handicap, and tournament finishes.  Below are some other items college scouts look for when recruiting golfers.

On the range: coaches are watching very closely to evaluate technique and general athleticism. They also want to see how the player practices.  Are they serious, disciplined, and focused or are they using practice time to socialize?  Does the player pick specific targets, practice their pre-shot routine, and use alignment aids while they practice?  Golf is a sport the requires constant practice and self discipline, so college coaches look for recruits that will put the time in to become a better golfer.

On the golf course: coaches are always interested to see how a player reacts to a tough situation.  How does the golfer handle a bad tee shot, missed putt, an iron shot that lands in the bunker, and any situation that could rattle the golfer.  Coaches want to see how a player handles adversity.

At the mid/low division one level: college coaches are recruiting the best of the best.  These recruits are long of the tee, accurate with their drives, have the ability to fade or draw the ball, can control their iron game, are very accurate from 150 yards and in, can get “up and down”, are really good around the green with their short game, are great putters, have good all-around golf game.

Course Management:  coaches want to know and see how you think your way around the golf course.  Do you hit driver when you should’t be, do you think about best shot when in trouble and finally are you able to recover from a bad shot and still score

Finally, all coaches are interested to see how players act on the golf course and with their peers.  Is the golfer cussing and throwing clubs after bad shots?  Do they have a reputation for having poor golf adequate?  Are they friendly with other golfers? 

In the final analysis, score is not the only way to evaluate talent.  If this were the case, then coaches would stay at home and recruit via the results online.  Pay attention to how you present yourself and how you act at tournaments.

Division 2

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  3+ years of varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of being one of the better players on your team.

Junior Circuit:  playing year round since age of 10 years old.

Measurables

Scoring Average:  78 or lower
Handicap: +5 to +8 range or better
Status:  A top 25 player in your city/state
Wins/Finish:  Coaches look for number of wins, top 5, and top 10 finishes

Tournaments

Events:  Regional & local tournaments
# of Players:  competing in events with 70-100+ participants
Average Finish:  consistently top 25 finisher
Slope Rating:  110+
Course Yardage:  6200+
Tourney Setup:  36 hole events

RecruitLook Scouting Report

College coaches look for certain things when recruiting golfers.  Golf is an individual sport; therefore, it is easier for recruits to get noticed/recruited based on scores, handicap, and tournament finishes.  Below are some other items college scouts look for when recruiting golfers.

On the range: coaches are watching very closely to evaluate technique and general athleticism. They also want to see how the player practices.  Are they serious, disciplined, and focused or are they using practice time to socialize?  Does the player pick specific targets, practice their pre-shot routine, and use alignment aids while they practice?  Golf is a sport the requires constant practice and self discipline, so college coaches look for recruits that will put the time in to become a better golfer.

On the golf course: coaches are always interested to see how a player reacts to a tough situation.  How does the golfer handle a bad tee shot, missed putt, an iron shot that lands in the bunker, and any situation that could rattle the golfer.  Coaches want to see how a player handles adversity.

At the division two level: college coaches are recruiting the best of the best.  These recruits are long of the tee, accurate with their drives, have the ability to fade or draw the ball, can control their iron game, are very accurate from 150 yards and in, can get “up and down”, are really good around the green with their short game, are great putters, have good all-around golf game.

Course Management: coaches want to know and see how you think your way around the golf course.  Do you hit driver when you should’t be, do you think about best shot when in trouble and finally are you able to recover from a bad shot and still score

Finally, all coaches are interested to see how players act on the golf course and with their peers.  Is the golfer cussing and throwing clubs after bad shots?  Do they have a reputation for having poor golf adequate?  Are they friendly with other golfers? 

In the final analysis, score is not the only way to evaluate talent.  If this were the case, then coaches would stay at home and recruit via the results online.  Pay attention to how you present yourself and how you act at tournaments.

Division 3 / NAIA

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  3+ years of varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of being one of the better players on your team.

Junior Circuit:  playing year round since age of 10 years old.

Measurables

Scoring Average:  78 – 82
Handicap:  +9 to +12 range or better
Status:  A top 25-30 player in your city/state
Wins/Finish:  Coaches look for number of wins, top 5, and top 10 finishes

Tournaments

Events:  State and local tournaments
# of Players:  competing in events with 50-70+ participants
Average Finish:  consistently top 30 finisher
Slope Rating:  105+
Course Yardage:  6000+
Tourney Setup:  18-36 hole events

RecruitLook Scouting Report

College coaches look for certain things when recruiting golfers.  Golf is an individual sport; therefore, it is easier for recruits to get noticed/recruited based on scores, handicap, and tournament finishes.  Below are some other items college scouts look for when recruiting golfers.

On the range: coaches are watching very closely to evaluate technique and general athleticism. They also want to see how the player practices.  Are they serious, disciplined, and focused or are they using practice time to socialize?  Does the player pick specific targets, practice their pre-shot routine, and use alignment aids while they practice?  Golf is a sport the requires constant practice and self discipline, so college coaches look for recruits that will put the time in to become a better golfer.

On the golf course: coaches are always interested to see how a player reacts to a tough situation.  How does the golfer handle a bad tee shot, missed putt, an iron shot that lands in the bunker, and any situation that could rattle the golfer.  Coaches want to see how a player handles adversity.

At the division 3 and NAIA level: college coaches are recruiting the best of the best.  These recruits are long of the tee, accurate with their drives, have the ability to fade or draw the ball, can control their iron game, are very accurate from 150 yards and in, can get “up and down”, are really good around the green with their short game, are great putters, have good all-around golf game.

Course Management: coaches want to know and see how you think your way around the golf course.  Do you hit driver when you should’t be, do you think about best shot when in trouble and finally are you able to recover from a bad shot and still score

Finally, all coaches are interested to see how players act on the golf course and with their peers.  Is the golfer cussing and throwing clubs after bad shots?  Do they have a reputation for having poor golf adequate?  Are they friendly with other golfers? 

In the final analysis, score is not the only way to evaluate talent.  If this were the case, then coaches would stay at home and recruit via the results online.  Pay attention to how you present yourself and how you act at tournaments.

Women’s Golf

Women’s golf recruiting guidelines for a high school recruit looking to be a college golfer.

Division 1 High Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  3-4 year varsity experience with at least 2-3 years of being one of the top players on your team.

Junior Circuit:  playing year round since age of 8-9 years old.

Measurables

Scoring Average:  72 or lower
Handicap:  scratch or better
Status:  A top 3-4 player in your city/state
Wins/Finish:  Coaches look for number of wins, top 5, and top 10 finishes

Tournaments

Events:  National tournaments & Regional tournaments
# of Players:  competing in events with 100+ participants
Average Finish:  consistently top 10 finisher
Slope Rating:  120+
Course Yardage:  6400+

Tourney Setup:  36 or 54 hole events

RecruitLook Scouting Report

College coaches look for certain things when recruiting golfers.  Golf is an individual sport; therefore, it is easier for recruits to get noticed/recruited based on scores, handicap, and tournament finishes.  Below are some other items college scouts look for when recruiting golfers.

On the range:  coaches are watching very closely to evaluate technique and general athleticism. They also want to see how the player practices.  Are they serious, disciplined, and focused or are they using practice time to socialize?  Does the player pick specific targets, practice their pre-shot routine, and use alignment aids while they practice?  Golf is a sport the requires constant practice and self discipline, so college coaches look for recruits that will put the time in to become a better golfer.

On the golf course:  coaches are always interested to see how a player reacts to a tough situation.  How does the golfer handle a bad tee shot, missed putt, an iron shot that lands in the bunker, and any situation that could rattle the golfer.  Coaches want to see how a player handles adversity.

At the high level division one:  college coaches are recruiting the best of the best.  These recruits are long of the tee, accurate with their drives, have the ability to fade or draw the ball, can control their iron game, are very accurate from 150 yards and in, can get “up and down”, are really good around the green with their short game, are great putters, have good all-around golf game.

Course Management:  Coaches want to know and see how you think your way around the golf course.  Do you hit driver when you should’t be, do you think about best shot when in trouble and finally are you able to recover from a bad shot and still score

Finally, all coaches are interested to see how players act on the golf course and with their peers.  Is the golfer cussing and throwing clubs after bad shots?  Do they have a reputation for having poor golf adequate?  Are they friendly with other golfers? 

In the final analysis, score is not the only way to evaluate talent.  If this were the case, then coaches would stay at home and recruit via the results online.  Pay attention to how you present yourself and how you act at tournaments.

Division 1 Mid/Low Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  3-4 year varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of being one of the top players on your team.

Junior Circuit:  playing year round since age of 9 years old.

Measurables

Scoring Average:  74 or lower
Handicap: +2 to +4 range or better
Status:  A top 10 player in your city/state
Wins/Finish:  Coaches look for number of wins, top 5, and top 10 finishes

Tournaments

Events: National tournaments & Regional tournaments
# of Players:  competing in events with 100+ participants
Average Finish:  consistently top 15 finisher
Slope Rating:  120+
Course Yardage:  6400+
Tourney Setup:  36 or 54 hole events

RecruitLook Scouting Report

College coaches look for certain things when recruiting golfers.  Golf is an individual sport; therefore, it is easier for recruits to get noticed/recruited based on scores, handicap, and tournament finishes.  Below are some other items college scouts look for when recruiting golfers.

On the range: coaches are watching very closely to evaluate technique and general athleticism. They also want to see how the player practices.  Are they serious, disciplined, and focused or are they using practice time to socialize?  Does the player pick specific targets, practice their pre-shot routine, and use alignment aids while they practice?  Golf is a sport the requires constant practice and self discipline, so college coaches look for recruits that will put the time in to become a better golfer.

On the golf course: coaches are always interested to see how a player reacts to a tough situation.  How does the golfer handle a bad tee shot, missed putt, an iron shot that lands in the bunker, and any situation that could rattle the golfer.  Coaches want to see how a player handles adversity.

At the mid/low division one level: college coaches are recruiting the best of the best.  These recruits are long of the tee, accurate with their drives, have the ability to fade or draw the ball, can control their iron game, are very accurate from 150 yards and in, can get “up and down”, are really good around the green with their short game, are great putters, have good all-around golf game.

Course Management:  coaches want to know and see how you think your way around the golf course.  Do you hit driver when you should’t be, do you think about best shot when in trouble and finally are you able to recover from a bad shot and still score

Finally, all coaches are interested to see how players act on the golf course and with their peers.  Is the golfer cussing and throwing clubs after bad shots?  Do they have a reputation for having poor golf adequate?  Are they friendly with other golfers? 

In the final analysis, score is not the only way to evaluate talent.  If this were the case, then coaches would stay at home and recruit via the results online.  Pay attention to how you present yourself and how you act at tournaments.

Division 2

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  3+ years of varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of being one of the better players on your team.

Junior Circuit:  playing year round since age of 10 years old.

Measurables

Scoring Average:  78 or lower
Handicap: +5 to +8 range or better
Status:  A top 25 player in your city/state
Wins/Finish:  Coaches look for number of wins, top 5, and top 10 finishes

Tournaments

Events:  Regional & local tournaments
# of Players:  competing in events with 70-100+ participants
Average Finish:  consistently top 25 finisher
Slope Rating:  110+
Course Yardage:  6200+
Tourney Setup:  36 hole events

RecruitLook Scouting Report

College coaches look for certain things when recruiting golfers.  Golf is an individual sport; therefore, it is easier for recruits to get noticed/recruited based on scores, handicap, and tournament finishes.  Below are some other items college scouts look for when recruiting golfers.

On the range: coaches are watching very closely to evaluate technique and general athleticism. They also want to see how the player practices.  Are they serious, disciplined, and focused or are they using practice time to socialize?  Does the player pick specific targets, practice their pre-shot routine, and use alignment aids while they practice?  Golf is a sport the requires constant practice and self discipline, so college coaches look for recruits that will put the time in to become a better golfer.

On the golf course: coaches are always interested to see how a player reacts to a tough situation.  How does the golfer handle a bad tee shot, missed putt, an iron shot that lands in the bunker, and any situation that could rattle the golfer.  Coaches want to see how a player handles adversity.

At the division two level: college coaches are recruiting the best of the best.  These recruits are long of the tee, accurate with their drives, have the ability to fade or draw the ball, can control their iron game, are very accurate from 150 yards and in, can get “up and down”, are really good around the green with their short game, are great putters, have good all-around golf game.

Course Management: coaches want to know and see how you think your way around the golf course.  Do you hit driver when you should’t be, do you think about best shot when in trouble and finally are you able to recover from a bad shot and still score

Finally, all coaches are interested to see how players act on the golf course and with their peers.  Is the golfer cussing and throwing clubs after bad shots?  Do they have a reputation for having poor golf adequate?  Are they friendly with other golfers? 

In the final analysis, score is not the only way to evaluate talent.  If this were the case, then coaches would stay at home and recruit via the results online.  Pay attention to how you present yourself and how you act at tournaments.

Division 3 / NAIA

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

High School:  3+ years of varsity experience with at least 1-2 years of being one of the better players on your team.

Junior Circuit:  playing year round since age of 10 years old.

Measurables

Scoring Average:  78 – 82
Handicap:  +9 to +12 range or better
Status:  A top 25-30 player in your city/state
Wins/Finish:  Coaches look for number of wins, top 5, and top 10 finishes

Tournaments

Events:  State and local tournaments
# of Players:  competing in events with 50-70+ participants
Average Finish:  consistently top 30 finisher
Slope Rating:  105+
Course Yardage:  6000+
Tourney Setup:  18-36 hole events

RecruitLook Scouting Report

College coaches look for certain things when recruiting golfers.  Golf is an individual sport; therefore, it is easier for recruits to get noticed/recruited based on scores, handicap, and tournament finishes.  Below are some other items college scouts look for when recruiting golfers.

On the range: coaches are watching very closely to evaluate technique and general athleticism. They also want to see how the player practices.  Are they serious, disciplined, and focused or are they using practice time to socialize?  Does the player pick specific targets, practice their pre-shot routine, and use alignment aids while they practice?  Golf is a sport the requires constant practice and self discipline, so college coaches look for recruits that will put the time in to become a better golfer.

On the golf course: coaches are always interested to see how a player reacts to a tough situation.  How does the golfer handle a bad tee shot, missed putt, an iron shot that lands in the bunker, and any situation that could rattle the golfer.  Coaches want to see how a player handles adversity.

At the division 3 and NAIA level: college coaches are recruiting the best of the best.  These recruits are long of the tee, accurate with their drives, have the ability to fade or draw the ball, can control their iron game, are very accurate from 150 yards and in, can get “up and down”, are really good around the green with their short game, are great putters, have good all-around golf game.

Course Management: coaches want to know and see how you think your way around the golf course.  Do you hit driver when you should’t be, do you think about best shot when in trouble and finally are you able to recover from a bad shot and still score

Finally, all coaches are interested to see how players act on the golf course and with their peers.  Is the golfer cussing and throwing clubs after bad shots?  Do they have a reputation for having poor golf adequate?  Are they friendly with other golfers? 

In the final analysis, score is not the only way to evaluate talent.  If this were the case, then coaches would stay at home and recruit via the results online.  Pay attention to how you present yourself and how you act at tournaments.