College Basketball Scouting Reports


College Basketball Scouting Reports

The RecruitLook staff has worked with thousands of recruits on getting them into the collegiate ranks.  The RecruitLook staff has also worked with and spoken to many college coaches to formulate the Scouting Report information provided in this section.  The information listed is not the determining factor on which college coaches will recruit you.  This is solely a guide to help you understand the data and information RecruitLook has gathered.

Point Guards

Basketball recruiting guidelines for a high school recruit looking to be a college basketball point guard.

Division 1 High Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play high level competitive AAU basketball on one of the top travel teams in your state or country.  Your team is playing in the top NCAA certified events across the country.  You might be on a team sponsored by Adidas, Nike, or Under Armour…but you don’t have to be on one of those teams to play HM ball.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 3-4 years, and more than likely starting since your sophomore or junior year. You will be the best on your team and probably an All-State and/or All-American.

Measurables

-Height : 6′ – 6’4″
-Weight : 160-180lbs
-Vertical : 28″-40″
-Agility : very good
-Speed : very quick

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 15+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 5-7+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 4-6+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 2-3+spg
-Other : usually a high 3 point and field goal percentage, and a good +/- assists-to-turnover ratio

RecruitLook Scouting Report

High major point guards are some of the most talented players in the entire country.  They’ll be featured on ESPN top 150, Rivals top 100, and ranked among the top players in the country by many of the recruiting services.

These point guards are usually getting recruited by the time they hit their freshman and sophomore years.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit.  High major point guards are usually play on the shoe sponsored travel teams at an early age, and definitely by the time they are a junior or senior.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level, but the high major guards will show: high basketball IQ, the ability to control and run an offense, great passing ability, can defend in the open court, can score consistently from outside with the ability to finish in the paint, and great athleticism to prove they can compete in a more uptempo and physical college game.

High major point guards will be the best on their high school team, and probably one of the tops on their AAU team.  They’ll be All-Conference, All-District, All-State, and some will be McDonald’s All-Americans.

Division 1 Mid-Major / Low-Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play high level competitive AAU basketball on one of the top travel teams in your state or country.  Your team is playing in the top NCAA certified events across the country.  You might be on a team sponsored by Adidas, Nike, or Under Armour…but you don’t have to be on one of those teams to play mid-major to low-major ball.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 2-4 years, and more than likely starting since your sophomore or junior year.  You will be the best on your team and probably an All-Conference, All-District, & All-State.

Measurables

-Height : 6′ – 6’3″
-Weight : 160-180lbs
-Vertical : 28″-36″
-Agility : very good
-Speed : very quick

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 15+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 4-6+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 3-5+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 2+spg
-Other : usually a high 3 point and field goal percentage, and a good +/- assists-to-turnover ratio

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Mid-major to low-major point guards are some of the most talented players in their region.  They’ll get more local and region recruiting coverage from the recruiting services.

These point guards are usually getting recruited by the time they hit their sophomore year, but more than likely, it will be your junior season when your recruitment picks up.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit.  Mid-major & low-major point guards usually play on the shoe sponsored travel teams at an early age, and definitely by the time they are a junior or senior.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level, but the mid-major to low-major guards will show: high basketball IQ, the ability to control and run an offense, great passing ability, can defend in the open court, can score consistently from outside with the ability to finish in the paint, and great athleticism to prove they can compete in a more uptempo and physical college game.

What separates a high major point guard to the mid-major to low-major point guards is usually physical attributes or pure athleticism.

Division 2

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play on either a high level competitive AAU basketball that is shoe sponsored, or you are playing on the next tier down.  The next tier down are competitive teams playing in major tournaments, but they are getting the sponsorship money that a shoe team is getting.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 2+ years, and more than likely starting since your junior year.  You will be the best on your team and probably an All-Conference, All-District, & possibly an All-State 2nd or 3rd teamer.

Measurables

-Height : 5’10” – 6’2″
Weight : 160-170lbs
-Vertical : 28″-34″
-Agility : good
-Speed : quick

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 10-14+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 4-5+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 2-5+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-Other : usually a high 3 point and field goal percentage, and a good +/- assists-to-turnover ratio

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division two point guards are talented players, but they aren’t at the same level as a D1 caliber point guard. Division two point guards don’t get a lot of recruiting attention from the national or bigger regional recruiting services.

These point guards are usually getting recruited by the time they hit their junior year. The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit. Division two point guards might play on the shoe sponsored travel teams, but they’ll probably be coming off the bench. Division two caliber point guards that play on more regional AAU teams will get more looks because they’ll have a better opportunity to get on the court and seen by coaches.

This level of point guard should look at attending showcase events and college camps to get more college recruiting exposure. The division one point guards don’t need the extra attention as much, but so many guards fall outside the D1 level that they need to be more proactive with their recruitment.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level, but division two guards will show: high basketball IQ, the ability to control and run an offense, great passing ability, can defend in the open court, and can score consistently from outside. A D2 guard will need to excel at a certain area of their game to make up for what they lack for the D1 level.

What separates a division one guard from a division two guard is usually physical attributes or pure athleticism.

Division 3 / NAIA

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play on a regional AAU travel team.  Your team plays in regional events with the occasional national tournament.  You’ll be a main contributor on your AAU team.  You might play on a shoe sponsored team, but you’ll be a role and/or bench player.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 1-2+ years, and more than likely starting since your junior or senior year.  You will be on of the better on your team and probably an All-Conference player.

Measurables

-Height : 5’8″ – 6’1″
-Weight : 150-165bs
-Vertical : 22″-30″
-Agility : good
-Speed : above average

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 8-10+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 3+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 2+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-Other : usually a high 3 point and field goal percentage, and a good +/- assists-to-turnover ratio

RecruitLook Scouting Reports

D3/NAIA point guards are good basketball players that get recruited based off their skills and their grades.  D3/NAIA coaches like coachable players that will excel in the classroom.  This level will lack the physical measurements to compete at the D1 level, but they could potentially compete at the D2 level depending on what the coaching staff is looking for in a recruit.

These point guards are lightly getting recruited during their junior year.  They’ll get some recruiting attention during their senior season.  They’ll need to go on unofficial visits to get more recruiting exposure and attention from the coaches looking at them.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit during their junior year, and they’ll probably play on the spring AAU circuit following their senior high school season. 

This level of point guard should look at attending showcase events and college camps to get more college recruiting exposure.  The division one point guards don’t need the extra attention as much, but so many guards fall outside the D1 level that they need to be more proactive with their recruitment.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level, but division two guards will show: grades are very important at this level (D3 have no athletic money, so academic money could be possible), high basketball IQ, the ability to control and run an offense, great passing ability, above average on the ball defender, good perimeter shooter, leader on the floor.  A D3/NAIA guard will need to excel at a certain area of their game to make up for what they lack for the higher collegiate levels.

Junior College

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play on a regional AAU travel team.  Your team plays in regional events with the occasional national tournament.  You’ll be a main contributor on your AAU team.  You might play on a shoe sponsored team and be a big contributor; however, you are looking at the JUCO route because of your grades.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 1-2+ years, and more than likely starting since your junior or senior year.  You will be on of the better on your team and probably an All-Conference honorable mention player.

Measurables

-Height : 5’8″ – 6’1″
-Weight : 150-175bs
-Vertical : 22″-34″
-Agility : above average
-Speed : above average

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 8+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 3+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 2+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-Other : usually a high 3 point and field goal percentage, and a good +/- assists-to-turnover ratio

RecruitLook Scouting Report

JUCO point guards are looking at the JUCO route because of their grades, they need to improve some area of their game, or they were under recruited based on the area they came from.

Grades play a big factor on why a recruit has to go JUCO.  Many D1 caliber players go the JUCO route because they can’t qualify academically for the NCAA ranks.  A recruit will go JUCO to focus on their game and most importantly their grades!

A recruit might need to go JUCO to work on a certain part of their game.  Maybe they are undersized and need to prove they can play against bigger and better competition before a D1-D2 coach makes an offer.  Maybe they need to get bigger and develop their game cause they are still a bit raw for the D1-D2 level.

There are millions of high school basketball recruits all over the country.  Many good players get passed up due to the fact that they come from an area that doesn’t get heavily recruited.  It happens to small high school recruits most often, but you’ll even see it in the bigger cities.  It is just a numbers game.  College coaches can’t recruit every single player that comes out of high school.

This level of point guard should look at attending showcase events and college camps to get more college recruiting exposure.  The division one point guards don’t need the extra attention as much, but so many guards fall outside the D1 level that they need to be more proactive with their recruitment.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level, but JUCO guards will show:  a good basketball IQ, the ability to control and run an offense, good passing ability, above average on the ball defender, decent perimeter shooter, leader on the floor.

Shooting Guards

Basketball recruiting guidelines for a high school recruit looking to be a college basketball shooting guard.

Division 1 High Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play high level competitive AAU basketball on one of the top travel teams in your state or country.  Your team is playing in the top NCAA certified events across the country.  You might be on a team sponsored by Adidas, Nike, or Under Armour…but you don’t have to be on one of those teams to play high-major ball.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 3-4 years, and more than likely starting since your freshman or sophomore year.  You will be the best on your team and probably an All-Conference, All-District, All-State, and All-American.

Measurables

-Height : 6’3” – 6’5″
-Weight : 170-180lbs
-Vertical : 28″-36″
Agility : very good
-Speed : very quick

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 15+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 4+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 5+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-3pt FG % : 42-45% from behind the arc
-FG % : 45-50%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

High major shooting guards are some of the most talented players in the country.  They’ll get national recruiting coverage from media outlets.

High major shooting guards are usually getting recruited by the time they hit their sophomore year.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit.  High major shooting guards usually play on the shoe sponsored travel teams at an early age, and definitely by the time they are in high school.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level, but the high major guards will show: high basketball IQ, good passing abilities, can defend in the open court, can score consistently from outside with the ability to finish in the paint, need to be able to score on pull-up jumpers, spot up jumpers, and jumpers off screens, shooting guards need to have a mid-range jump shot, ability to switch over and handle the point if need be (bringing the ball up, running the offense for a few possessions), and great athleticism to prove they can compete in a more uptempo and physical college game.

The college game has evolved recently and more coaches at the high major level are looking for the shooting guards that are “bouncy”.  Coaches want guards that can crash the glass, dunk in traffic, can get shots up over taller defenders.  If you don’t have athleticism and bounce in your game, you better be a lethal outside shooter.

Division 1 Mid-Major / Low-Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play high level competitive AAU basketball on one of the top travel teams in your state or country.  Your team is playing in the top NCAA certified events across the country.  You might be on a team sponsored by Adidas, Nike, or Under Armour…but you don’t have to be on one of those teams to play mid-major to low-major ball.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 2-4 years, and more than likely starting since your sophomore or junior year.  You will be the best on your team and probably an All-Conference, All-District, & All-State.

Measurables

-Height : 6’1” – 6’4″
-Weight : 170-180lbs
-Vertical : 28″-36″
-Agility : very good
-Speed : very quick

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 15+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 3+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 4+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-3pt FG % : 40% from behind the arc
-FG % : 40-45%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Mid-major to low-major shooting guards are some of the most talented players in their region.  They’ll get more local and region recruiting coverage from the recruiting services.

Mid-major/Low-major shooting guards are usually getting recruited by the time they hit their sophomore year, but more than likely, it will be your junior season when your recruitment picks up.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit.  Mid-major & low-major shooting guards usually play on the shoe sponsored travel teams at an early age, and definitely by the time they are a junior or senior.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level, but the mid-to-low major guards will show: high basketball IQ, good passing abilities, can defend in the open court, can score consistently from outside with the ability to finish in the paint, need to be able to score on pull-up jumpers, spot up jumpers, and jumpers off screens, shooting guards need to have a mid-range jump shot, ability to switch over and handle the point if need be (bringing the ball up, running the offense for a few possessions), and great athleticism to prove they can compete in a more uptempo and physical college game.

Usually what separates a high-major shooting guard from a mid-to-low major shooting guard is athletic ability, size, and quickness.  The high major game is extremely fast and a lot of the game is played above the rim, so shooting guards at the high major level can bring both of those attributes.

Division 2

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play on either a high level competitive AAU basketball that is shoe sponsored, or you are playing on the next tier down.  The next tier down are competitive teams playing in major tournaments, but they are getting the sponsorship money that a shoe team is getting.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 2+ years, and more than likely starting since your junior year.  You will be the best on your team and probably an All-Conference, All-District, & possibly an All-State 2nd or 3rd teamer.

Measurables

-Height : 6’0” – 6’2″
-Weight : 165-175lbs
-Vertical : 26”+
-Agility : good
-Speed : above average

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 12+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 3-4+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 2+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-3pt FG % : 37% from behind the arc
-FG % : 40-45%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division two shooting guards are talented players, but they aren’t at the same level as a D1 caliber shooting guard.  Division two shooting guards don’t get a lot of recruiting attention from the national or bigger regional recruiting services.  They’ll get some exposure but only if they are borderline low-major / division 2 player.

These shooting guards are usually getting recruited by the time they hit their junior year.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit.  Division two shooting guards might play on the shoe sponsored travel teams, but they’ll probably be coming off the bench.  Division two caliber shooting guards that play on more regional AAU teams will get more looks because they’ll have a better opportunity to get on the court and seen by coaches.

This level of shooting guard should look at attending showcase events and college camps to get more college recruiting exposure.  The division one shooting guards don’t need the extra attention as much, but so many guards fall outside the D1 level that they need to be more proactive with their recruitment.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level, but the division two guards will show: high basketball IQ, good passing abilities, are probably better defenders in the half court than open court, can score consistently from outside, need to be able to score on pull-up jumpers, spot up jumpers, and jumpers off screens, shooting guards need to have a mid-range jump shot, ability to switch over and handle the point if need be (bringing the ball up, running the offense for a few possessions).

Usually what separates a division one guard from a division two guard is athletic ability, overall speed with and without the ball, and strength/size.

Division 3 / NAIA

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play on a regional AAU travel team.  Your team plays in regional events with the occasional national tournament.  You’ll be a main contributor on your AAU team.  You might play on a shoe sponsored team, but you’ll be a role and/or bench player.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 1-2+ years, and more than likely starting since your junior or senior year.  You will be on of the better on your team and probably an All-Conference player.

Measurables

-Height : 6’0”
-Weight : 155-165lbs
-Vertical : 22”+
-Agility : above average
-Speed : above average

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 8-10+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 3+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 2+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-3pt FG % : 32-37% from behind the arc
-FG % : 38-43%

RecruitLook Scouting Reports

D3/NAIA shooting guards are good basketball players that get recruited based off their skills and their grades.  D3/NAIA coaches like coachable players that will excel in the classroom.  This level will lack the physical measurements to compete at the D1 level, but they could potentially compete at the D2 level depending on what the coaching staff is looking for in a recruit.

D3/NAIA shooting guards are lightly getting recruited during their junior year.  They’ll get some recruiting attention during their senior season.  They’ll need to go on unofficial visits to get more recruiting exposure and attention from the coaches looking at them.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit during their junior year, and they’ll probably play on the spring AAU circuit following their senior high school season. 

This level of shooting guard should look at attending showcase events and college camps to get more college recruiting exposure.  The division shooting point guards don’t need the extra attention as much, but so many guards fall outside the D1 level that they need to be more proactive with their recruitment.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level, but the D3/NAIA guards will show: high basketball IQ, good passing abilities, are probably better defenders in the half court than open court, can score consistently from outside, need to be able to score on pull-up jumpers, spot up jumpers, and jumpers off screens, shooting guards need to have a mid-range jump shot, ability to switch over and handle the point if need be (bringing the ball up, running the offense for a few possessions).

Usually what separates a division one guard from a division three and NAIA guard is athletic ability, overall speed with and without the ball, and strength/size.

Junior College

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play on a regional AAU travel team.  Your team plays in regional events with the occasional national tournament.  You’ll be a main contributor on your AAU team.  You might play on a shoe sponsored team and be a big contributor; however, you are looking at the JUCO route because of your grades.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 1-2+ years, and more than likely starting since your junior or senior year.  You will be on of the better on your team and probably an All-Conference honorable mention player.

Measurables

-Height : 6’0-6’3”
-Weight : 165-175lbs
-Vertical : 22”-28”+
-Agility : above average
-Speed : above average

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 8-10+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 3-5+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 4+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-3pt FG % : 32-37% from behind the arc
-FG % : 38-43%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

JUCO shooting guards are looking at the JUCO route because of their grades, they need to improve some area of their game, or they were under recruited based on the area they came from.

Grades play a big factor on why a recruit has to go JUCO.  Many D1 caliber players go the JUCO route because they can’t qualify academically for the NCAA ranks.  A recruit will go JUCO to focus on their game and most importantly their grades!

A recruit might need to go JUCO to work on a certain part of their game.  Maybe they are undersized and need to prove they can play against bigger and better competition before a D1-D2 coach makes an offer.  Maybe they need to get bigger and develop their game cause they are still a bit raw for the D1-D2 level.

There are millions of high school basketball recruits all over the country.  Many good players get passed up due to the fact that they come from an area that doesn’t get heavily recruited.  It happens to small high school recruits most often, but you’ll even see it in the bigger cities.  It is just a numbers game.  College coaches can’t recruit every single player that comes out of high school.

This level of shooting guard should look at attending showcase events and college camps to get more college recruiting exposure.  The division one shooting guards don’t need the extra attention as much, but so many guards fall outside the D1 level that they need to be more proactive with their recruitment.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level, but the JUCO guards will show: high basketball IQ, good passing abilities, how do they defend in the open court, half court, on the ball, or away from the ball, can score consistently from outside, need to be able to score on pull-up jumpers, spot up jumpers, and jumpers off screens, shooting guards need to have a mid-range jump shot, ability to switch over and handle the point if need be (bringing the ball up, running the offense for a few possessions).

Small Forwards

Basketball recruiting guidelines for a high school recruit looking to be a college basketball small forwards.

Division 1 High Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play high level competitive AAU basketball on one of the top travel teams in your state or country.  Your team is playing in the top NCAA certified events across the country.  You might be on a team sponsored by Adidas, Nike, or Under Armour…but you don’t have to be on one of those teams to play high-major ball.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 3-4 years, and more than likely starting since your freshman or sophomore year.  You will be the best on your team and probably an All-Conference, All-District, All-State, and All-American.

Measurables

-Height : 6’6” – 6’8″
-Weight : 200-220lbs
-Vertical : 28″-36″
-Agility : very good
-Speed : very quick

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 15+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 2-3+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 6-8+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-Blocks per Game : 1+bpg
-3pt FG % : 42% from behind the arc
-FG % : 45-50%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

High major small forwards are some of the most talented players in the country.  They’ll get national recruiting coverage from media outlets.

High major small forwards are usually getting recruited by the time they hit their sophomore year.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit.  High major small forwards usually play on the shoe sponsored travel teams at an early age, and definitely by the time they are in high school.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level, but the high major small forwards will show: good athleticism, can they get up and down the recruit to be able to guard smaller players, can they defend a smaller player and bigger player in the half-court, can they crash the glass, how well do they defend the post, do they have the ability to hit outside jumpers, do they have the ability to hit the 3-point shot consistently, can they score facing the hoop, can they score with moves while their back is to the basket, can they handle the ball when needed, can they play above the rim.

The college game has evolved recently and more coaches at the high major level are looking for small forwards that are athletic and can play above the rim.  Coaches also want a small forward that can defend multiple positions on the floor.

Division 1 Mid-Major / Low-Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play high level competitive AAU basketball on one of the top travel teams in your state or country.  Your team is playing in the top NCAA certified events across the country.  You might be on a team sponsored by Adidas, Nike, or Under Armour…but you don’t have to be on one of those teams to play mid-major to low-major ball.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 2-4 years, and more than likely starting since your sophomore or junior year.  You will be the best on your team and probably an All-Conference, All-District, & All-State.

Measurables

-Height : 6’6” – 6’7″
-Weight : 200-220lbs
-Vertical : 28″-36″
-Agility : very good
-Speed : very quick

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 15+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 2-3+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 7+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-Blocks per Game : 1+bpg
-3pt FG % : 40% from behind the arc
-FG % : 45%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Mid-major to low-major small forwards are some of the most talented players in their region.  They’ll get more local and region recruiting coverage from the recruiting services.

Mid-major/Low-major small forwards are usually getting recruited by the time they hit their sophomore year, but more than likely, it will be your junior season when your recruitment picks up.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit.  Mid-major & low-major small forwards usually play on the shoe sponsored travel teams at an early age, and definitely by the time they are a junior or senior.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level, but the mid/low major small forwards will show: good athleticism, can they get up and down the recruit to be able to guard smaller players, can they defend a smaller player and bigger player in the half-court, can they crash the glass, how well do they defend the post, do they have the ability to hit outside jumpers, do they have the ability to hit the 3-point shot consistently, can they score facing the hoop, can they score with moves while their back is to the basket, can they handle the ball when needed, can they play above the rim.

Usually what separates a high-major small forward from a mid-to-low major small forward is athletic ability, size, and quickness.  The high major game is extremely fast and a lot of the game is played above the rim, so small forwards at the high major level can bring both of those attributes.

Division 2

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play on either a high level competitive AAU basketball that is shoe sponsored, or you are playing on the next tier down.  The next tier down are competitive teams playing in major tournaments, but they are getting the sponsorship money that a shoe team is getting.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 2+ years, and more than likely starting since your junior year.  You will be the best on your team and probably an All-Conference, All-District, & possibly an All-State 2nd or 3rd teamer.

Measurables

–Height : 6’5” – 6’6″
-Weight :
200+lbs
-Vertical :
26″+
-Agility :
good
-Speed :
above average

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 12+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 2+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 5+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-Blocks per Game : 0-1+bpg
-3pt FG % : 35% from behind the arc
-FG % : 40%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division two small forwards are talented players, but they aren’t at the same level as a D1 caliber small forwards.  Division two small forwards don’t get a lot of recruiting attention from the national or bigger regional recruiting services.  They’ll get some exposure but only if they are borderline low-major / division 2 player.

Division two small forwards are usually getting recruited by the time they hit their junior year.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit.  Division two small forwards might play on the shoe sponsored travel teams, but they’ll probably be coming off the bench.  Division two caliber small forwards that play on more regional AAU teams will get more looks because they’ll have a better opportunity to get on the court and seen by coaches.

This level of small forward should look at attending showcase events and college camps to get more college recruiting exposure.  The division one small forwards don’t need the extra attention as much, but so many players fall outside the D1 level that they need to be more proactive with their recruitment.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level, but the division two small forwards will show: good athleticism, can they get up and down the recruit to be able to guard smaller players, can they defend a smaller player and bigger player in the half-court, can they crash the glass, how well do they defend the post, do they have the ability to hit outside jumpers, do they have the ability to hit the 3-point shot, can they score facing the hoop, can they score with moves while their back is to the basket, can they handle the ball when needed.

Usually what separates a division one small forward from a division two small forward is athletic ability, strength/size, and overall skill level.

Division 3 / NAIA

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play on a regional AAU travel team.  Your team plays in regional events with the occasional national tournament.  You’ll be a main contributor on your AAU team.  You might play on a shoe sponsored team, but you’ll be a role and/or bench player.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 1-2+ years, and more than likely starting since your junior or senior year.  You will be on of the better on your team and probably an All-Conference player.

Measurables

-Height : 6’4” – 6’6″
-Weight : 170-200+lbs
-Vertical : 24″+
-Agility : average
-Speed : average

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 8-10+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 1-2+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 3+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 0-1+spg
-Blocks per Game : 0-1+bpg
-3pt FG % : 30% from behind the arc
-FG % : 40%

RecruitLook Scouting Reports

D3/NAIA small forwards are good basketball players that get recruited based off their skills and their grades.  D3/NAIA coaches like coachable players that will excel in the classroom.  This level will lack the physical measurements to compete at the D1 level, but they could potentially compete at the D2 level depending on what the coaching staff is looking for in a recruit.

D3/NAIA small forwards are lightly getting recruited during their junior year.  They’ll get some recruiting attention during their senior season.  They’ll need to go on unofficial visits to get more recruiting exposure and attention from the coaches looking at them.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit during their junior year, and they’ll probably play on the spring AAU circuit following their senior high school season. 

This level of small forward should look at attending showcase events and college camps to get more college recruiting exposure.  The division one small forwards don’t need the extra attention as much, but so many players fall outside the D1 level that they need to be more proactive with their recruitment.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level, but the division two small forwards will show: good athleticism, can they get up and down the recruit to be able to guard smaller players, can they defend a smaller player and bigger player in the half-court, can they crash the glass, how well do they defend the post, do they have the ability to hit outside jumpers, do they have the ability to hit the 3-point shot, can they score facing the hoop, can they score with moves while their back is to the basket, can they handle the ball when needed.

Usually what separates a division two small forward from a division three and NAIA small forward is athletic ability, and strength/size.

Junior College

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play on a regional AAU travel team.  Your team plays in regional events with the occasional national tournament.  You’ll be a main contributor on your AAU team.  You might play on a shoe sponsored team and be a big contributor; however, you are looking at the JUCO route because of your grades.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 1-2+ years, and more than likely starting since your junior or senior year.  You will be on of the better on your team and probably an All-Conference honorable mention player.

Measurables

-Height : 6’4”+
-Weight : 180+lbs
-Vertical : 24″+
-Agility : average
-Speed : moderate

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 8-+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 1+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 3+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 0-1+spg
-Blocks per Game : 0-1+bpg
-3pt FG % : 30% from behind the arc
-FG % : 40%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

JUCO small forwards are looking at the JUCO route because of their grades, they need to improve some area of their game, or they were under recruited based on the area they came from.

Grades play a big factor on why a recruit has to go JUCO.  Many D1 caliber players go the JUCO route because they can’t qualify academically for the NCAA ranks.  A recruit will go JUCO to focus on their game and most importantly their grades!

A recruit might need to go JUCO to work on a certain part of their game.  Maybe they are undersized and need to prove they can play against bigger and better competition before a D1-D2 coach makes an offer.  Maybe they need to get bigger and develop their game cause they are still a bit raw for the D1-D2 level.

There are millions of high school basketball recruits all over the country.  Many good players get passed up due to the fact that they come from an area that doesn’t get heavily recruited.  It happens to small high school recruits most often, but you’ll even see it in the bigger cities.  It is just a numbers game.  College coaches can’t recruit every single player that comes out of high school.

This level of small forward should look at attending showcase events and college camps to get more college recruiting exposure.  The division one small forwards don’t need the extra attention as much, but so many players fall outside the D1 level that they need to be more proactive with their recruitment.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level, but the division two small forwards will show: good athleticism, can they get up and down the recruit to be able to guard smaller players, can they defend a smaller player and bigger player in the half-court, can they crash the glass, how well do they defend the post, do they have the ability to hit outside jumpers, do they have the ability to hit the 3-point shot, can they score facing the hoop, can they score with moves while their back is to the basket, can they handle the ball when needed.

Power Forwards

Basketball recruiting guidelines for a high school recruit looking to be a college basketball power forwards.

Division 1 High Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play high level competitive AAU basketball on one of the top travel teams in your state or country.  Your team is playing in the top NCAA certified events across the country.  You might be on a team sponsored by Adidas, Nike, or Under Armour…but you don’t have to be on one of those teams to play high-major ball.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 3-4 years, and more than likely starting since your freshman or sophomore year.  You will be the best on your team and probably an All-Conference, All-District, All-State, and All-American.

Measurables

-Height : 6’8″+
-Weight : 220-240lbs
-Vertical : 28″-30″
-Agility : good
-Speed : above average

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 15+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 2+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 8-10+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-Blocks per Game : 2-3+bpg
-FG % : 45-50%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

High major power forwards are some of the most talented players in the country.  They’ll get national recruiting coverage from media outlets.

High major power forwards are usually getting recruited by the time they hit their sophomore year.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit.  High major power forwards usually play on the shoe sponsored travel teams at an early age, and definitely by the time they are in high school.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level: good athleticism, the ability to grab a rebound and go right back up without having to generate momentum, must be able to dominate on the glass, can they crash the glass with authority, how well do they box out and rebound, must be able to defend the low post, can they step out and guard on the perimeter, can they alter opponent’s shots, do they have offensive game facing up and back to the basket, how many post moves do they have, need to be able to hit jump shots around the paint area, can they hit mid-range jump shots, do they have good footwork in low post.

College coaches at the high major level like: athleticism, size, strength, and need to be a contributor on the offensive and defensive end.

Division 1 Mid-Major / Low-Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play high level competitive AAU basketball on one of the top travel teams in your state or country.  Your team is playing in the top NCAA certified events across the country.  You might be on a team sponsored by Adidas, Nike, or Under Armour…but you don’t have to be on one of those teams to play mid-major to low-major ball.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 2-4 years, and more than likely starting since your sophomore or junior year.  You will be the best on your team and probably an All-Conference, All-District, & All-State.

Measurables

-Height : 6’7″+
-Weight : 210-220lbs
-Vertical : 28″+
-Agility : good
-Speed : above average

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 14+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 2+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 8+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-Blocks per Game : 2-3+bpg
-FG % : 45-48%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Mid-major to low-major power forwards are some of the most talented players in their region.  They’ll get more local and region recruiting coverage from the recruiting services.

Mid-major/Low-major power forwards are usually getting recruited by the time they hit their sophomore year, but more than likely, it will be your junior season when your recruitment picks up.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit.  Mid-major & low-major power forwards usually play on the shoe sponsored travel teams at an early age, and definitely by the time they are a junior or senior.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level: good athleticism, the ability to grab a rebound and go right back up without having to generate momentum, must be able to dominate on the glass, can they crash the glass with authority, how well do they box out and rebound, must be able to defend the low post, can they step out and guard on the perimeter, can they alter opponent’s shots, do they have offensive game facing up and back to the basket, how many post moves do they have, need to be able to hit jump shots around the paint area, can they hit mid-range jump shots, do they have good footwork in low post.

Usually what separates a high-major power forward from a mid-to-low major power forward is athletic ability, size, and offensive/defensive games.  A typical high major power forward is a better all-around offensive and defensive player than the mid-to-low major power forwards.

Division 2

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play on either a high level competitive AAU basketball that is shoe sponsored, or you are playing on the next tier down.  The next tier down are competitive teams playing in major tournaments, but they are getting the sponsorship money that a shoe team is getting.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 2+ years, and more than likely starting since your junior year.  You will be the best on your team and probably an All-Conference, All-District, & possibly an All-State 2nd or 3rd teamer.

Measurables

-Height : 6’6″+
-Weight :
200-210lbs
-Vertical :
25″+
-Agility :
good
-Speed :
average

 

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 12+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 1-2+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 6-8+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-Blocks per Game : 1-2+bpg
-FG % : 45%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division two power forwards are talented players, but they aren’t at the same level as a D1 caliber power forwards.  Division two power forwards don’t get a lot of recruiting attention from the national or bigger regional recruiting services.  They’ll get some exposure but only if they are borderline low-major / division 2 player.

Division two power forwards are usually getting recruited by the time they hit their junior year.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit.  Division two power forwards might play on the shoe sponsored travel teams, but they’ll probably be coming off the bench.  Division two caliber power forwards that play on more regional AAU teams will get more looks because they’ll have a better opportunity to get on the court and seen by coaches.

This level of small forward should look at attending showcase events and college camps to get more college recruiting exposure.  The division one power forwards don’t need the extra attention as much, but so many players fall outside the D1 level that they need to be more proactive with their recruitment.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level: above average athleticism, must be able to compete on the glass, can they crash the glass with authority or do they get pushed around, how well do they box out and rebound, must be able to defend the low post, can they step out and guard on the perimeter, can they alter opponent’s shots, do they have offensive game facing up and back to the basket, how many post moves do they have, need to be able to hit jump shots around the paint area, can they hit mid-range jump shots, do they have good footwork in low post.

Usually what separates a division one power forward from a division two power forward is athletic ability, strength/size, and overall skill level.

Division 3 / NAIA

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play on a regional AAU travel team.  Your team plays in regional events with the occasional national tournament.  You’ll be a main contributor on your AAU team.  You might play on a shoe sponsored team, but you’ll be a role and/or bench player.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 1-2+ years, and more than likely starting since your junior or senior year.  You will be on of the better on your team and probably an All-Conference player.

Measurables

-Height : 6’6″+
-Weight : 200-210lbs
-Vertical : 23″+
-Agility : average
-Speed : average

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 10+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 1+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 5+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-Blocks per Game : 1+bpg
-FG % : 42%

RecruitLook Scouting Reports

D3/NAIA power forwards are good basketball players that get recruited based off their skills and their grades.  D3/NAIA coaches like coachable players that will excel in the classroom.  This level will lack the physical measurements to compete at the D1 level, but they could potentially compete at the D2 level depending on what the coaching staff is looking for in a recruit.

D3/NAIA power forwards are lightly getting recruited during their junior year.  They’ll get some recruiting attention during their senior season.  They’ll need to go on unofficial visits to get more recruiting exposure and attention from the coaches looking at them.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit during their junior year, and they’ll probably play on the spring AAU circuit following their senior high school season. 

This level of power forward should look at attending showcase events and college camps to get more college recruiting exposure.  The division one power forwards don’t need the extra attention as much, but so many players fall outside the D1 level that they need to be more proactive with their recruitment.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level: above average athleticism, must be able to compete on the glass, can they crash the glass with authority or do they get pushed around, how well do they box out and rebound, must be able to defend the low post, can they step out and guard on the perimeter, can they alter opponent’s shots, do they have offensive game facing up and back to the basket, how many post moves do they have, need to be able to hit jump shots around the paint area, can they hit mid-range jump shots, do they have good footwork in low post.

Usually what separates a division two power forward from a division three and NAIA power forward is athletic ability, and strength/size.

Junior College

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play on a regional AAU travel team.  Your team plays in regional events with the occasional national tournament.  You’ll be a main contributor on your AAU team.  You might play on a shoe sponsored team and be a big contributor; however, you are looking at the JUCO route because of your grades.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 1-2+ years, and more than likely starting since your junior or senior year.  You will be on of the better on your team and probably an All-Conference honorable mention player.

Measurables

-Height : 6’6″+
-Weight : 200-210lbs
-Vertical : 23″+
-Agility : average
-Speed : average

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 8+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 1+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 5+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-Blocks per Game : 1+bpg
-FG % : 40%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

JUCO power forwards are looking at the JUCO route because of their grades, they need to improve some area of their game, or they were under recruited based on the area they came from.

Grades play a big factor on why a recruit has to go JUCO.  Many D1 caliber players go the JUCO route because they can’t qualify academically for the NCAA ranks.  A recruit will go JUCO to focus on their game and most importantly their grades!

A recruit might need to go JUCO to work on a certain part of their game.  Maybe they are undersized and need to prove they can play against bigger and better competition before a D1-D2 coach makes an offer.  Maybe they need to get bigger and develop their game cause they are still a bit raw for the D1-D2 level.

There are millions of high school basketball recruits all over the country.  Many good players get passed up due to the fact that they come from an area that doesn’t get heavily recruited.  It happens to small high school recruits most often, but you’ll even see it in the bigger cities.  It is just a numbers game.  College coaches can’t recruit every single player that comes out of high school.

This level of power forward should look at attending showcase events and college camps to get more college recruiting exposure.  The division one power forwards don’t need the extra attention as much, but so many players fall outside the D1 level that they need to be more proactive with their recruitment.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level: above average athleticism, must be able to compete on the glass, can they crash the glass with authority or do they get pushed around, how well do they box out and rebound, must be able to defend the low post, can they step out and guard on the perimeter, can they alter opponent’s shots, do they have offensive game facing up and back to the basket, how many post moves do they have, need to be able to hit jump shots around the paint area, can they hit mid-range jump shots, do they have good footwork in low post.

Centers

Basketball recruiting guidelines for a high school recruit looking to be a college basketball centers.

Division 1 High Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play high level competitive AAU basketball on one of the top travel teams in your state or country.  Your team is playing in the top NCAA certified events across the country.  You might be on a team sponsored by Adidas, Nike, or Under Armour…but you don’t have to be on one of those teams to play high-major ball.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 3-4 years, and more than likely starting since your freshman or sophomore year.  You will be the best on your team and probably an All-Conference, All-District, All-State, and All-American.

Measurables

-Height : 6’10″+
-Weight : 240lbs+
-Vertical : 26″-34″
-Agility : good
-Speed : above average

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 15+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 2+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 10-12+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-Blocks per Game : 3+bpg
-FG % : 50%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

High major centers are some of the most talented players in the country.  They’ll get national recruiting coverage from media outlets.

High major centers are usually getting recruited by the time they hit their sophomore year.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit.  High major centers usually play on the shoe sponsored travel teams at an early age, and definitely by the time they are in high school.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level: good athleticism, how quickly can they get up and down the court, are the a liability on one end of the court or the other, the ability to grab a rebound and go right back up without having to generate momentum, must be able to dominate on the glass, can they crash the glass with authority, how well do they box out and rebound, must be able to defend the low post, can they step out and guard around the lane-extended area, they need to be able to alter shots with & without making the block, do they have offensive game facing up and back to the basket, how many post moves do they have, need to be able to hit jump shots around the paint area, can they hit mid-range jump shots, do they have good footwork in low post.

College coaches at the high major level like: above-average athleticism, size, strength, length (wingspan), and need to be a contributor on the offensive and defensive end.

Division 1 Mid-Major / Low-Major

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play high level competitive AAU basketball on one of the top travel teams in your state or country.  Your team is playing in the top NCAA certified events across the country.  You might be on a team sponsored by Adidas, Nike, or Under Armour…but you don’t have to be on one of those teams to play mid-major to low-major ball.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 2-4 years, and more than likely starting since your sophomore or junior year.  You will be the best on your team and probably an All-Conference, All-District, & All-State.

Measurables

-Height : 6’8″+
-Weight : 220lbs+
-Vertical : 26″-30″
-Agility : good
-Speed : above average

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 13+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 2+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 8-10+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-Blocks per Game : 2+bpg
-FG % : 45%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Mid-major to low-major centers are some of the most talented players in their region.  They’ll get more local and region recruiting coverage from the recruiting services.

Mid-major/Low-major centers are usually getting recruited by the time they hit their sophomore year, but more than likely, it will be your junior season when your recruitment picks up.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit.  Mid-major & low-major centers usually play on the shoe sponsored travel teams at an early age, and definitely by the time they are a junior or senior.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level: good athleticism, how quickly can they get up and down the court, are the a liability on one end of the court or the other, the ability to grab a rebound and go right back up without having to generate momentum, must be able to dominate on the glass, can they crash the glass with authority, how well do they box out and rebound, must be able to defend the low post, can they step out and guard around the lane-extended area, they need to be able to alter shots with & without making the block, do they have offensive game facing up and back to the basket, how many post moves do they have, need to be able to hit jump shots around the paint area, can they hit mid-range jump shots, do they have good footwork in low post.

Usually what separates a high-major center from a mid-to-low major center is athletic ability, size, and/or offensive/defensive games.  A typical high major center is a better all-around offensive and defensive player than the mid-to-low major centers.

Division 2

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play on either a high level competitive AAU basketball that is shoe sponsored, or you are playing on the next tier down.  The next tier down are competitive teams playing in major tournaments, but they are getting the sponsorship money that a shoe team is getting.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 2+ years, and more than likely starting since your junior year.  You will be the best on your team and probably an All-Conference, All-District, & possibly an All-State 2nd or 3rd teamer.

Measurables

-Height : 6’7″+
-Weight : 220lbs+
-Vertical : 26″+
-Agility : above average
-Speed : above average

 

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 12+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 1-2+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 6-8+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-Blocks per Game : 1-2+bpg
-FG % : 45%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

Division two centers are talented players, but they aren’t at the same level as a D1 caliber center.  Division two centers don’t get a lot of recruiting attention from the national or bigger regional recruiting services.  They’ll get some exposure but only if they are borderline low-major / division 2 player.

Division two centers are usually getting recruited by the time they hit their junior year.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit.  Division two centers might play on the shoe sponsored travel teams, but they’ll probably be coming off the bench.  Division two caliber centers that play on more regional AAU teams will get more looks because they’ll have a better opportunity to get on the court and seen by coaches.

This level of small forward should look at attending showcase events and college camps to get more college recruiting exposure.  The division one centers don’t need the extra attention as much, but so many players fall outside the D1 level that they need to be more proactive with their recruitment.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level: their athleticism, how quickly can they get up and down the court, are the a liability on one end of the court or the other, the ability to grab a rebound and go right back up without having to generate momentum, can they crash the glass with authority, how well do they box out and rebound, must be able to defend the low post, can they step out and guard around the lane-extended area, they need to be able to alter shots with & without making the block, do they have offensive game facing up and back to the basket, how many post moves do they have, need to be able to hit jump shots around the paint area, can they hit mid-range jump shots, do they have good footwork in low post.

Usually what separates a division one center from a division two center is athletic ability, strength/size, length & wingspan, and overall skill level.

Division 3 / NAIA

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play on a regional AAU travel team.  Your team plays in regional events with the occasional national tournament.  You’ll be a main contributor on your AAU team.  You might play on a shoe sponsored team, but you’ll be a role and/or bench player.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 1-2+ years, and more than likely starting since your junior or senior year.  You will be on of the better on your team and probably an All-Conference player.

Measurables

-Height : 6’7″+
-Weight : 210lbs+
-Vertical : 22″+
-Agility : average
-Speed : average

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 9+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 1+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 7+rpg
-Blocks per Game : 1+bpg
-FG % : 40-45%

RecruitLook Scouting Reports

D3/NAIA centers are good basketball players that get recruited based off their skills and their grades.  D3/NAIA coaches like coachable players that will excel in the classroom.  This level will lack the physical measurements to compete at the D1 level, but they could potentially compete at the D2 level depending on what the coaching staff is looking for in a recruit.

D3/NAIA centers are lightly getting recruited during their junior year.  They’ll get some recruiting attention during their senior season.  They’ll need to go on unofficial visits to get more recruiting exposure and attention from the coaches looking at them.  The recruiting will pick up for them on the AAU circuit during their junior year, and they’ll probably play on the spring AAU circuit following their senior high school season. 

This level of center should look at attending showcase events and college camps to get more college recruiting exposure.  The division one center don’t need the extra attention as much, but so many players fall outside the D1 level that they need to be more proactive with their recruitment.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level: their athleticism, how quickly can they get up and down the court, are the a liability on one end of the court or the other, the ability to grab a rebound and go right back up without having to generate momentum, can they crash the glass with authority, how well do they box out and rebound, must be able to defend the low post, can they step out and guard around the lane-extended area, they need to be able to alter shots with & without making the block, do they have offensive game facing up and back to the basket, how many post moves do they have, need to be able to hit jump shots around the paint area, can they hit mid-range jump shots, do they have good footwork in low post.

Usually what separates a division two center from a division three and NAIA center is athletic ability.

Junior College

This is data that RecruitLook has gathered from college coaches, industry trends, and past experiences.  This is not meant to rank you or place you in a certain division level.  There is no guarantee that you will play at any level based off of our findings.  These are merely in place to guide you down the right path.

Many other variables come into play when a college coach is recruiting a player, for example: Grades, Character, Talent Upside, Playing Style, And More.

Playing Experience

-AAU : You play on a regional AAU travel team.  Your team plays in regional events with the occasional national tournament.  You’ll be a main contributor on your AAU team.  You might play on a shoe sponsored team and be a big contributor; however, you are looking at the JUCO route because of your grades.

-Varsity Basketball : You’ve been on the varsity basketball team the past 1-2+ years, and more than likely starting since your junior or senior year.  You will be on of the better on your team and probably an All-Conference honorable mention player.

Measurables

-Height : 6’7″+
-Weight : 210lbs+
-Vertical : 22″+
-Agility : average
-Speed : average

Statistics

-Points Per Game : 8+ppg
-Assists Per Game : 1+apg
-Rebounds Peg Game : 5+rpg
-Steals Per Game : 1+spg
-Blocks per Game : 1+bpg
-FG % : 40%

RecruitLook Scouting Report

JUCO centers are looking at the JUCO route because of their grades, they need to improve some area of their game, or they were under recruited based on the area they came from.

Grades play a big factor on why a recruit has to go JUCO.  Many D1 caliber players go the JUCO route because they can’t qualify academically for the NCAA ranks.  A recruit will go JUCO to focus on their game and most importantly their grades!

A recruit might need to go JUCO to work on a certain part of their game.  Maybe they are undersized and need to prove they can play against bigger and better competition before a D1-D2 coach makes an offer.  Maybe they need to get bigger and develop their game cause they are still a bit raw for the D1-D2 level.

There are millions of high school basketball recruits all over the country.  Many good players get passed up due to the fact that they come from an area that doesn’t get heavily recruited.  It happens to small high school recruits most often, but you’ll even see it in the bigger cities.  It is just a numbers game.  College coaches can’t recruit every single player that comes out of high school.

This level of center should look at attending showcase events and college camps to get more college recruiting exposure.  The division one centers don’t need the extra attention as much, but so many players fall outside the D1 level that they need to be more proactive with their recruitment.

Coaches will be looking for different things when recruiting at this level: their athleticism, how quickly can they get up and down the court, are the a liability on one end of the court or the other, the ability to grab a rebound and go right back up without having to generate momentum, can they crash the glass with authority, how well do they box out and rebound, must be able to defend the low post, can they step out and guard around the lane-extended area, they need to be able to alter shots with & without making the block, do they have offensive game facing up and back to the basket, how many post moves do they have, need to be able to hit jump shots around the paint area, can they hit mid-range jump shots, do they have good footwork in low post.