Recruiting Coverage

How to get a college coach to notice your for recruiting


There is a right way and a wrong to go about getting noticed for a college scholarship.  Too many times we hear the following from athletes or parents:

“Coaches are passing up on me.”
“My kid is better than half the players out there.”
“He is an All-Conference player — coaches will find him.”
“My kid had a good game and college coaches were at the game.  He/she will get an offer soon.”
“I’m not sure what my GPA is.  I think it is around a 2.5 or something.”
“Our high school coach said he’ll make some calls for us.”

These are all lines that signal to us that their recruitment has no real sense of direction…there is no game plan in place.  There are millions of athletes all vying for the same scholarship dollars.  You must strategically execute a well constructed marketing plan to get coaches to buy-in to your skills.  Otherwise, you probably will get lost in the shuffle.

Here are a few tips to get coaches to notice you for recruiting:

1.)  You need to be proactive with your recruitment.  Do not sit back and hope a college coach “discovers” you.  College scouts generally don’t attend high school games to scout new recruits; they are there to see athletes they already are recruiting.

2.)  Attend off-season events where college coaches will be at.  Example: soccer tournaments, AAU basketball events, baseball showcases, volleyball exposure events, 7v7 football tournaments, etc etc.

3.)  Football players must attend a football combine to get tested.  College coaches want this information, and a good 40-yard dash time or vertical jump could separate you from the pack.

4.)  Attend college camps.  Don’t get to just any college camp.  Go to the camps that will benefit you the most.  If you have been talking with the Ole Miss coach and not the Georgia coach, then go to the Ole Miss camp.

5.)  Know where you stand academically.  You cannot lie to a coach about your grades.  Sooner or later they’ll find out, and it is usually one of the first things they ask about when talking with you.  Grades are important!

6.)  Don’t rely solely on your high school coach to get you a scholarship.  A high school coach has a lot of other responsibilities to focus on other than your college recruitment.  Definitely rely on them for support and guidance, but don’t expect them to cater to your every need.

7.)  Do something good for your community, or get involved with a school activity outside your sport.  Coaches like when they see athletes that can manage more than one activity and are good citizens in the community.  It makes you a better recruiting target when you do this.

Read more recruiting tips at the Recruit University and Contact a RecruitLook Scout for recruiting help!