RecruitLook

College Search

Report Abuse

Winston-Salem State University

Winston-Salem State University, a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina, is a historically black public research university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States.

Tag

Location

Address
601 S Martin Luther King Jr Dr,
City
Winston-Salem
State
NC
Zip/Post Code
27110

Contact Information

Phone
Fax
Website
Financial Aid Website

Stats

Total Undergrad enrollment
5245
Total Graduate enrollment
444
In State Tuition Fees
4941
Out State Tuition Fees
14091
ACT Score
19
SAT Score
960
Grade Point Average(GPA)
3.2
Male Female Ratio
30:70
Acceptance Rate
54%
Student Faculty Ratio
13:01

Additional Information

College Type
Public
Religious Affiliation
N/A
Campus Housing
No
Mission Statement
NULL
Mascot
Ram
Colors
White Red
Conference
Central Intercollegiate

College History

History

Dr. Simon Green Atkins distinguished himself in his home state of North Carolina as an advocate of teacher-training programs for African Americans. He founded a small school, Winston-Salem Teachers College, that he developed into Winston-Salem State University, a four-year institution, and oversaw its transition from private to state control. His abiding interest in teacher-training also led him to become a founder of the North Carolina Negro Teachers Association. The oldest child of a brick layer and former slaves Allen and Eliza Atkins, Simon Green Atkins was born on June 11, 1863, in the village of Haywood, in Chatham County, North Carolina, between Sanford and Raleigh. His town flourished during the period just after the Revolutionary War, but by the late 19th century the railroad and the neighboring town of Moncure had overshadowed it. At one time the area was considered as a location for the state capital as well as the state university. As a child, Atkins worked on a farm with his grandparents. Atkins studied in the town school under pioneer black educators who came from St. Augustine�s Normal and Collegiate Institute (later St. Augustine�s College in Raleigh). One of these was Anna Julia Cooper, later prominent for her work as an activist, scholar, feminist, and school administrator in Washington, D.C. This cadre of educators went out into remote communities to teach rural blacks. Atkins also taught at the town school for a while before his college years, and in 1880 he enrolled in St. Augustine�s. He spent summers teaching in the rural schools of Chatham and Moore counties. After he graduated with distinction in 1884, renowned educator and orator Joseph Charles Price, president of Livingstone College, an African Methodist Episcopal Zion church-supported institution in Salisbury, North Carolina, invited Atkins to join his faculty. Atkins agreed and became grammar school department head. He spent six years at Livingstone (1884�90) and spent the last two years of his tenure there in the dual role as educator and treasurer of the college. During summer months he conducted institutes for black teachers in various counties. The town educators of Winston (before its merger in 1913 with Salem to become Winston-Salem) lured Atkins to the post as principal of the Depot Street School, where he remained from 1890 to 1895. This was the state�s largest public school for African Americans. His work with the North Carolina Negro Teachers� Association (NCNTA), which he helped to organize about 1881, had stimulated his interest in teacher-training schools for blacks. He directed this group as it established the foundation for a standard black teachers� college in the state. Soon after he began his duties at Depot Street, he intensified his efforts to build such a school for African Americans and sought assistance from the Winston Board of Trade, Chamber of Commerce, and local white residents. By then, the state had begun plans to fund an agricultural college for its African American residents; hearing this, Atkins sought funds to locate the new college in Winston. Local support for this move was good, as the black community donated $2,000, R. J. Reynolds of tobacco fame contributed $500, and Atkins obtained 50 acres (200,000 m2) of land along with the backing of the Chamber of Commerce. Although Atkins lobbied the state legislature in Raleigh on behalf of this plan, Winston and its residents lost out to nearby Greensboro, where citizens offered 14 acres (57,000 m2) of land and $11,000. The university was established by Dr. Simon Green Atkins in 1892 with funds donated by industrialist John Fox Slater. Chartered by the state of North Carolina in 1897 as Slater Industrial and State Normal School and renamed Winston-Salem Teachers College in 1925, it was the first African American institution in the United States to grant degrees in elementary teacher education.citation needed The name was changed to Winston-Salem State University in 1969, and it merged into the University of North Carolina system in 1972.

College Specialty

Specialty

Preparing diverse students for success in the 21st Century, Winston-Salem State University offers quality educational programs at the baccalaureate and graduate levels. Students are engaged in active and experiential learning and have access to education through flexible delivery modes. The university is dedicated to the development of students through excellence in teaching, scholarship and service. As a comprehensive, historically Black constituent institution of the University of North Carolina, Winston-Salem State University contributes to the social, cultural, intellectual and economic growth of the region, North Carolina and beyond.

Alumni

Alumni

Donald Evans 1987 former NFL player Louis Farrakhan attended leader of the Nation of Islam Oronde Gadsden former NFL player Cleo Hill former professional basketball player; first person from a CIAA school to be drafted in the first round of the National Basketball Association Richard Huntley former NFL player Arrington Jones former NFL player Earl "the Pearl" Monroe 1967 former National Basketball Association player Lorraine H. Morton 1938 first African-American and longest-serving mayor of Evanston, Illinois Timmy Newsome former NFL player Monte Ross 1992 Head Basketball Coach University of Delaware Louise Smith Educator, helped to establish the first kindergarten program in N.C. Stephen A. Smith 1989 The Philadelphia Inquirer sports columnist, co-star of ESPN First Take and former host of ESPN's Quite Frankly with Stephen A. Smith Yancey Thigpen former all-pro National Football League player Luke Torian 1980 Member of the Virginia House of Delegates from the 35th District Theodore "Ted" Blunt Wilmington, Delaware City Council President William Hayes 2008 professional football player Jim Reid former NBA player Earl "the Twirl" Williams professional basketball player

Campus

Campus

Urban

X
X
X
X