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University of Virginia

The University of Virginia (often abbreviated as UVA, UVa, or Virginia) is a public research university in Charlottesville, Virginia, United States. It was conceived and designed by U.S. President Thomas Jefferson, and established in 1819. UVA's initial Board of Visitors included former Presidents of the United States Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe. Monroe owned the initial site of the University, which was mostly farmland. His law office and farmhouse are now the site of Brown College at Monroe Hill, a residential college at UVA
 
UVA is the only university campus in the United States that is designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. UVA's athletic teams compete in Division I of the NCAA and are collectively known as the Virginia Cavaliers. They compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference.

Location

Address
1826 University Avenue
City
Charlottesville
State
VA
Zip/Post Code
22904-4846

Contact Information

Phone
Fax
Financial Aid Website

Stats

Total Undergrad enrollment
15822
Total Graduate enrollment
8085
In State Tuition Fees
12458
Out State Tuition Fees
39844
ACT Score
32
SAT Score
1460
Grade Point Average(GPA)
4
Male Female Ratio
44:56
Acceptance Rate
29%
Student Faculty Ratio
16:01

Additional Information

College Type
Public
Religious Affiliation
N/A
Campus Housing
Yes
Mission Statement
NULL
Mascot
Cavalier
Colors
Orange and Navy Blue
Conference
Atlantic Coast

College History

History
In 1802, while serving as President of the United States, Thomas Jefferson wrote to artist Charles Willson Peale that his concept of the new university would be "on the most extensive and liberal scale that our circumstances would call for and our faculties meet". Virginia was already home to The College of William & Mary, but Jefferson lost confidence in his alma mater, partly because of its religious stances and lack of courses in the sciences.
 
Although Jefferson flourished under the tutelage of College of William & Mary professors William Small and George Wythe, his concerns with the College became great enough by 1800 that he wrote: "We have in that State, a college just well enough endowed to draw out the miserable existence to which a miserable constitution has doomed it". Thus, he began planning a university more aligned with his educational ideals.
 
Farmland just outside Charlottesville was purchased from James Monroe by the Board of Visitors as Central College in 1817. The school laid its first building's cornerstone in late 1817, and the Commonwealth of Virginia chartered the new university on January 25, 1819. John Hartwell Cocke collaborated with James Madison, Monroe, and Joseph Carrington Cabell to fulfill Jefferson's dream to establish the University. Cocke and Jefferson were appointed to the building committee to supervise the construction. The University's first classes met on March 7, 1825.

College Specialty

Specialty

The University of Virginia is a public institution of higher learning guided by a founding vision of discovery, innovation, and development of the full potential of talented students from all walks of life. It serves the Commonwealth of Virginia, the nation, and the world by developing responsible citizen leaders and professionals; advancing, preserving, and disseminating knowledge; and providing world-class patient care.

Alumni

Alumni
Among the individuals who have attended or graduated from the University of Virginia are author Edgar Allan Poe, Nobel Laureate James M. Buchanan, medical researcher Walter Reed, painter Georgia O'Keeffe, novelist Robert Miskimon polar explorer Richard Byrd, computer scientist John Backus, pioneer kidney transplant surgeon J. Hartwell Harrison, five NASA astronauts (Patrick G. Forrester, Karl Gordon Henize, Bill Nelson, Thomas Marshburn, and Kathryn C. Thornton), deep sea vent researcher Richard Lutz.
 
Alumni Association:http://alumni.virginia.edu/

Campus

Campus
Throughout its history, the University of Virginia has won praise for its unique Jeffersonian architecture. In January 1895, less than a year before the Great Rotunda Fire, The New York Times said that the design of the University of Virginia "was incomparably the most ambitious and monumental architectural project that had or has yet been conceived in this century".
 
In the United States Bicentennial issue of their AIA Journal, the American Institute of Architects called it "the proudest achievement of American architecture in the past 200 years". Today, the University of Virginia remains an architectural landmark and popular tourist destination. In 2011, Travel+Leisure listed the University as one of the most beautiful college campuses in the United States.
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