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University of Tulsa

The University of Tulsa (TU) is a private university located in Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States. The university is historically affiliated with the Presbyterian Church. The university offers programs in petroleum engineering, English, computer science, natural sciences, Clinical and Industrial/Organizational Psychology, and engineering disciplines. Its faculty includes the famous Russian poet Yevgeny Yevtushenko, psychologist Robert Hogan, political scientist Robert Donaldson. The campus's design is predominantly English Gothic, and the university manages the Gilcrease Museum, which includes one of the largest collections of American Western art in the world.
 
TU's athletic teams compete in Division I of the NCAA as members of the American Athletic Conference (The American) and are collectively known as the Tulsa Golden Hurricane.
 

Tag

Location

Address
800 S Tucker Dr
City
Tulsa
State
OK
Zip/Post Code
74104-3189

Contact Information

Phone
Fax
Website
Financial Aid Website

Stats

Total Undergrad enrollment
3160
Total Graduate enrollment
1166
In State Tuition Fees
33702
Out State Tuition Fees
33702
ACT Score
31
SAT Score
1410
Grade Point Average(GPA)
3.8
Male Female Ratio
58:42
Acceptance Rate
40%
Student Faculty Ratio
11:01

Additional Information

College Type
Private
Religious Affiliation
Presbyterian Church
Campus Housing
Yes
Mission Statement
NULL
Mascot
Captain Cane
Colors
Old Gold, Royal Blue and Crimson
Conference
American Athletic

College History

History
The Presbyterian School for Girls (also known as "Minerva Home") was founded in Muskogee, Indian Territory to offer a primary education to Creek girls. In 1894, it was expanded to become Henry Kendall College, named in honor of Reverend Henry Kendall, secretary of the Presbyterian Board of Home Missions.  The first president was William A. Caldwell, who served until 1896. He was succeeded by William Robert King. Kendall College, while still in Muskogee, granted the first post-secondary degree in Oklahoma in June 1898. Under King, the college was moved from its original location in downtown Muskogee to a larger campus on lands donated by Pleasant Porter. 
 
The opening of the new campus coincided with the start of the tenure of the third president, A. Grant Evans. Over the next ten years, Evans oversaw the struggling school. In most years, class sizes remained small and although the Academy, the attached elementary, middle, and high school was more successful; by the end of the 1906/07 year Kendall College had had only 27 collegiate graduates. At the request of the administration, the Synod of Indian Territory assumed control as trustees and began to look at alternatives for the future of the school. When the administration was approached by the comparatively smaller town of Tulsa and offered a chance to move, the decision was made to relocate. 
 
The Tulsa Commercial Club (a forerunner of the Tulsa Chamber of Commerce) decided to bid for the college. Club members who packaged a bid in 1907 to move the college to Tulsa included: B. Betters, H. O. McClure, L. N. Butts, W. L. North, James H. Hall (sic), Grant C. Stebbins, Rev. Charles W. Kerr, C. H. Nicholson. The offer included $100,000, 20 acres of real estate and a guarantee for utilities and street car service. 
 
The school opened to thirty-five students in September 1907, two months before Oklahoma became a state. These first students attended classes at the First Presbyterian Church until permanent buildings could be erected on the new campus. This became the start of higher education in Tulsa. Kendall Hall, the first building of the new school, was completed in 1908  and was quickly followed by two other buildings. All three buildings have since been demolished, with Kendall the last to be razed in 1972. The bell that once hung in the Kendall Building tower was saved and displayed in Bayless Plaza.

College Specialty

Specialty

The University of Tulsa is a private, independent, doctoral-degree-granting institution whose mission reflects these core values: excellence in scholarship, dedication to free inquiry, integrity of character, and commitment to humanity. 

Alumni

Alumni

TU Alumni Chapters and Clubs are the perfect way to connect to TU in your part of the world. Since the TU Alumni Association began its Chapters program in 2002, alumni and friends in Tulsa and across the country (and most recently, the world) have joined together in their own communities.

Alumni Association:www.tualumni.com

Campus

Campus
The campus of the University of Tulsa centers on a wide, grassy, quad-like space known as Dietler Commons, formerly called "The U." The predominant architectural style is English Gothic. Most of the buildings are constructed from tan and rose-colored Crab Orchard sandstone from Tennessee interspersed with stone quarried in Arkansas. Other materials include Bedford limestone from Indiana and slate quarried in Vermont.
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