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University of South Carolina

The University of South Carolina (also referred to as The USC, SC, South Carolina, or simply Carolina) is a public, co-educational research university located in Columbia, South Carolina, United States, with seven satellite campuses. Its campus covers over 359 acres (145 ha) in downtown Columbia not far from the South Carolina State House.
 
The University is categorized by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as having "very high research activity" and curricular community engagement. It has been ranked as an "up-and-coming" university by U.S. News & World Report, and its undergraduate and graduate International Business programs have ranked among the top three programs in the nation for over a decade. It also houses the largest collection of Robert Burns and Scottish literature materials outside of Scotland, and the largest Ernest Hemingway collection in the world.
 
Founded in 1801 as South Carolina College, USC is the flagship institution of the University of South Carolina System and offers more than 350 programs of study leading to bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees from fourteen degree-granting colleges and schools. The University of South Carolina System has an enrollment of approximately 47,724 students, with 32,848 on the main Columbia campus as of fall 2013. USC also has several thousand future students in feeder programs at surrounding technical colleges. Professional schools on the Columbia campus include social work, business, engineering, law, medicine, and pharmacy.

Tag

Location

Address
700 Sumter Street
City
Columbia
State
SC
Zip/Post Code
29208

Contact Information

Phone
Fax
Website
Financial Aid Website

Stats

Total Undergrad enrollment
23363
Total Graduate enrollment
7925
In State Tuition Fees
10816
Out State Tuition Fees
28528
ACT Score
29
SAT Score
1290
Grade Point Average(GPA)
4
Male Female Ratio
46:54
Acceptance Rate
65%
Student Faculty Ratio
17:01

Additional Information

College Type
Public
Religious Affiliation
N/A
Campus Housing
Yes
Mission Statement
NULL
Mascot
Cocky
Colors
Garnet and Black
Conference
Southeastern

College History

History

The University was founded as South Carolina College on December 19, 1801, by an act of the General Assembly initiated by Governor John Drayton in an effort to promote harmony between the Lowcountry and the Backcountry. On January 10, 1805, having an initial enrollment of nine students, the college commenced classes with a traditional classical curriculum. The first president was the Baptist minister and theologian Reverend Jonathan Maxcy.

He was an alumnus of Brown University, with an honorary degree from Harvard University. Before coming to the college, Maxcy had served as the second president of Brown and the third president of Union College. Maxcy's tenure lasted from 1804 through 1820.[10] South Carolina College as it appeared in 1850 looking from College Street When South Carolina College opened its doors in 1801, the building now known as Rutledge College was the only building on campus. Located one block southeast of the State Capitol, it served as an administrative office, academic building, residence hall, and chapel. However, the master plan for the original campus called for a total of eleven buildings, all facing a large lush gathering area. In 1807, the original President's House was the next building to be erected.

The building now known as DeSaussure College followed shortly thereafter, and the remaining eight buildings were constructed over the next several decades. When completed, all eleven buildings formed a U-shape open to Sumter Street. This modified quadrangle became known as the Horseshoe. As with other southern universities in the antebellum period, the most important organizations for students were the two literary societies, the Clariosophic Society and the Euphradian Society.[11] These two societies, which arose from a split in an earlier literary society known as the Philomathic, grew to encapsulate the majority of the student body from the 1820s onward. The College became a symbol of the South in the antebellum period as its graduates were on the forefront of secession from the Union. With the generous support of the General Assembly, South Carolina College acquired a reputation as the leading institution of the South and attracted several noteworthy scholars, including Francis Lieber, Thomas Cooper, and Joseph LeConte.

Civil War and Reconstruction Seventy-two students were present for classes in January 1862 and the college functioned as best it could until a call by the Confederate government for South Carolina to fill its quota of 18,000 soldiers. A system of conscription would begin on March 20 for all men between the ages of eighteen and forty-five, so on March 8 all of the students at the college volunteered for service in order to avoid the dishonor of having been conscripted. Despite the depletion of students, the professors issued a notice that the college would temporarily close and would reopen to those under eighteen. When the college reopened on March 17, only nine students showed up for classes and it became quite apparent to all that the college would not last past the end of the term in June. On June 25 with the consent of the state government, the Confederate authorities took possession of the college buildings and converted them into a hospital.

After many unsuccessful attempts to reopen the college, the trustees passed a resolution on December 2, 1863 that officially closed the college. By February 1865, Sherman's army had reached the outskirts of Columbia and the college was spared from destruction by the Union forces because of its use as a hospital. In addition, a company of the 25th Iowa Volunteer Infantry Regiment was stationed at the campus on February 17 to protect it from harm and to thwart off pillaging Yankee soldiers. An 1872 aerial illustration of the University of South Carolina Horseshoe The Union army took possession of the college on May 24, 1865 and although the future for the college appeared bleak with it under military control, General John Porter Hatch sent a letter on June 19 to the remaining professors at the college that it should reopen as soon as possible. 

College Specialty

Specialty

The primary mission of the University of South Carolina Columbia is the education of the states citizens through teaching, research, creative activity, and community engagement.

Alumni

Alumni

Andrew Card, BS 1971, U.S. Secretary of Transportation under George H. W. Bush, White House Chief of Staff under George W. Bush Rita Cosby, BA 1989, three time Emmy Award winner, special correspondent for Inside Edition Lindsey Graham, BA 1977, South Carolina Senator in the United States Senate Richard Riley, JD 1959, former Governor of South Carolina, 6th United States Secretary of Education Joe Wilson, JD 1972, the U.S. Representative for South Carolina's 2nd congressional district Larry Kellner, BS 1981, former CEO of Continental Airlines, member of the Boeing board of directors Alex Molinaroli, President and CEO of Johnson Controls, BS EE 1983, member of Interstate Batteries Board of Directors Stephen K. Benjamin, Mayor of Columbia, SC

Alumni Association:www.sc.edu/alumni/

Campus

Campus

Urban, 359 Acres (145Ha)

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