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University of Chicago

The University of Chicago (U of C, UChicago, or simply Chicago) is a private research university in Chicago, Illinois, United States. The university consists of the College of the University of Chicago, various graduate programs and interdisciplinary committees organized into four divisions, six professional schools, and a school of continuing education. The university enrolls approximately 5,000 students in the College and about 15,000 students overall.

Tag

Location

Address
5801 S Ellis Ave
City
Chicago
State
IL
Zip/Post Code
60637

Contact Information

Phone
Fax
Financial Aid Website

Stats

Total Undergrad enrollment
5659
Total Graduate enrollment
7259
In State Tuition Fees
45324
Out State Tuition Fees
45324
ACT Score
33
SAT Score
2228
Grade Point Average(GPA)
4.23
Male Female Ratio
53:47
Acceptance Rate
8%
Student Faculty Ratio
6:01

Additional Information

College Type
Private
Religious Affiliation
N/A
Campus Housing
Yes
Mission Statement
NULL
Mascot
Phoenix
Colors
Maroon And White
Conference
Independent

College History

History

The University of Chicago was created and incorporated as a coeducational, secular institution in 1890 by the American Baptist Education Society and a donation from oil magnate and philanthropist John D. Rockefeller on land donated by Marshall Field. Organized as an independent institution legally, it replaced the first Baptist university of the same name, which had closed in 1886 due to extended financial and leadership problems. William Rainey Harper became the modern university's first president on July 1, 1891, and the university opened for classes on October 1, 1892. The business school was founded in 1898, and the law school was founded in 1902. Harper died in 1906, and was replaced by a succession of three presidents whose tenures lasted until 1929. During this period, the Oriental Institute was founded to support and interpret archeological work in what was then called the Near East. In the 1890s, the University of Chicago, fearful that its vast resources would injure smaller schools by drawing away good students, affiliated with several regional colleges and universities: Des Moines College, Kalamazoo College, Butler College, and Stetson University. Under the terms of the affiliation, the schools were required to have courses of study comparable to those at the University, to notify the university early of any contemplated faculty appointments or dismissals, to make no faculty appointment without the university's approval, and to send copies of examinations for suggestions. The University of Chicago agreed to confer a degree on any graduating senior from an affiliated school who made a grade of A for all four years, and on any other graduate who took twelve weeks additional study at the University of Chicago. A student or faculty member of an affiliated school was entitled to free tuition at the University of Chicago, and Chicago students were eligible to attend an affiliated school on the same terms and receive credit for their work. The University of Chicago also agreed to provide affiliated schools with books and scientific apparatus and supplies at cost; special instructors and lecturers without cost except travel expenses; and a copy of every book and journal published by the University of Chicago Press at no cost. The agreement provided that either party could terminate the affiliation on proper notice. Several University of Chicago professors disliked the program, as it involved uncompensated additional labor on their part, and they believed it cheapened the academic reputation of the University. The program passed into history by 1910.

College Specialty

Specialty

The Laboratory Schools are home to the youngest members of the University of Chicago's academic community. We ignite and nurture an enduring spirit of scholarship, curiosity, creativity, and confidence. We value learning experientially, exhibiting kindness, and honoring diversity.

Alumni

Alumni

In 2004, the University of Chicago claimed 133,155 living alumni.1 Notable alumni in the field of government and politics include community organizer Saul Alinsky, Obama campaign advisor David Axelrod, Attorney General and federal judge Robert Bork, Attorney General Ramsay Clark, former Governor of New Jersey Jon Corzine, Prohibition agent Eliot Ness, Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, Prime Minister of Canada William Lyon Mackenzie King and World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz,former minister of economy and finance in Haiti Leslie Delatour. In business, Goldman Sachs and MF Global CEO Jon Corzine, Arley D. Cathey, Bloomberg L.P. CEO Daniel Doctoroff, Credit Suisse CEO Brady Dougan, Morningstar, Inc. founder and CEO Joe Mansueto, and businessman and author Dick Stoken are all alumni. In journalism, notable graduates include New York Times columnist David Brooks, Washington Post columnist David Broder, Washington Post publisher Katharine Graham, investigative journalist Seymour Hirsch, The Progressive columnist Milton Mayer, statistical analyst Nate Silver, writer and activist Richard B. Spencer, and CBS News correspondent Rebecca Jarvis. In literature, novelists Philip Roth, Tucker Max, and Kurt Vonnegut are graduates, as well as Lauren Oliver, author of the best-selling Delirium Trilogy. In academia, alumni include astronomer Carl Sagan, economists Milton Friedman, Thomas Sowell and Eugene Fama, astronomer Edwin Hubble, Africanist Marimba Ani and international relations scholar Samuel P. Huntington. Notable former students who did not graduate include novelist Saul Bellow, film critic Roger Ebert, Oracle Corporation founder and CEO Larry Ellison, and director, writer and comedian Mike Nichols.

Campus

Campus

Urban, 211 Acres (85.4 Ha)

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