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Tougaloo College

Tougaloo College is a private, co-educational, historically black, liberal arts institution of higher education founded in 1869, in Madison County, north of Jackson, Mississippi, USA.�

Location

Address
500 W County Line Rd
City
Tougaloo
State
MS
Zip/Post Code
39174

Stats

In State Tuition Fees
9740
Out State Tuition Fees
9740
ACT Score
21
SAT Score
830
Grade Point Average(GPA)
3
Male Female Ratio
35:65
Acceptance Rate
40%
Student Faculty Ratio
12:01

Additional Information

College Type
Private
Religious Affiliation
United Church of Christ
Campus Housing
Yes
Mission Statement
Tougaloo College is a private, coeducational, historically black, church-related, but not church controlled, four-year liberal arts institution located on West County Line Road on the northern edge of the city of Jackson, Missisisippi. Founded in 1869 by the American Missionary Association, Tougaloo College was chartered on the principles that it be accessible to all irrespective of their religious tenets
Mascot
Bulldog
Colors
Scarlet Royal Blue
Conference
Gulf Coast

College History

History

In 1869, the American Missionary Association of New York purchased 500 acres (202 ha) of one of the largest former plantations in central Mississippi to build a college for freedmen and their children, recently freed slaves. The purchase included a standing mansion and outbuildings, which were immediately converted for use as a school. The next year expansion of facilities began in earnest with the construction of two new buildings � Washington Hall, a 70 foot long edifice containing classrooms and a lecture hall, and Boarding Hall, a two story building which included a kitchen and dining hall, a laundry, and dormitories for 30 female students. Costs of construction were paid by the United States government through the education department of its Bureau of Refugees and Freedmen. Additional funds, totaling $25,500 in all, were provided for development of the school farm, including monies for farm implements and livestock. In 1871, the Mississippi State Legislature granted the new institution a formal charter under the name of Tougaloo University. No contingency fund was provided for the day-to-day operation of the school, with some students paying a tuition of $1 per month while others attended tuition free, contributing labor on the school farm in lieu of fees. The cost of two teachers at the school for five months were paid by the county boards of education of Hinds and Madison Counties; all additional operating funds were provided by the American Missionary Association. In its initial incarnation Tougaloo University was not a university in the modern sense of the term, instead serving as an institution which provided basic education of black students born under slavery along with the training of capable African-American students for service as teachers. At the end of 1871 the school included 94 "elementary students," 47 that were part of the "normal school," and 1 categorized as "academic" � a total student body of 142. At this time the school found itself in dire need of expanded facilities and operational funds and an appeal was made by three leaders of Tougaloo University to the Mississippi Superintendent of Public Education for a state role in the institution. Legislation followed authorizing the establishment of a State Normal School on the grounds of Tougaloo and providing a total of $4,000 for two years to help provide teachers' salaries, student aid, and for the purchase of desks. As part of the establishment of the Normal School at Tougaloo, each county in the state was provided with two free scholarships, and every student declaring an intention to teach in Mississippi's common schools was to be allotted a stipend of 50 cents per week out of the state funds for student aid, an amount capped at $1,000 per year. In 1873 Tougaloo University added a theological department for students intending on entering the Christian ministry and expanded its industrial department, adding a cotton gin, apparatus for grinding corn, and developing capacity for the manufacture of simple furniture on site. On January 23, 1881 Washington Hall � the main classroom building � caught fire during religious services and was entirely destroyed. For the rest of the academic year classes were conducted in a new barn recently constructed on campus, nicknamed "Ayrshire Hall." In the spring a brickyard was established on campus and on May 31, 1881 the foundation was laid for a new classroom building, a three-storey facility named Strieby Hall after Reverend M.E. Strieby of New York, a venerated leader of the American Missionary Association.

College Specialty

Specialty

Tougaloo College is a private, coeducational, historically black, church-related, but not church controlled, four-year liberal arts institution located on West County Line Road on the northern edge of the city of Jackson, Missisisippi. Founded in 1869 by the American Missionary Association, Tougaloo College was chartered on the principles that it be accessible to all irrespective of their religious tenets, and conducted on the most liberal principles for the benefit of our citizens in general. Tougaloo acknowledges and respects its traditions, remains dedicated to the equality of all people, and continues to be a value-oriented community where students are guided by a concerned faculty and staff. The members of this community apply current knowledge to prepare students for lifelong learning related to new information and emerging technologies, as well as humane standards in a global society. Tougaloo offers an undergraduate curriculum designed to encourage students to apply critical thought

Alumni

Alumni

Colia Clark civil rights activist and candidate for U.S. Senate in New York Aunjanue Ellis attended actor Lawrence Guyot 1963 civil rights activist who was director of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Joyce Ladner, PhD 1964 sociologist, civil rights activist, and first female president of Howard University Anne Moody author and civil rights activist Aaron Shirley, MD founder of Jackson Medical Mall and recipient of MacArthur award Bennie Thompson 1968 U.S. Congressman Walter Turnbull, PhD founder of the Boys Choir of Harlem Walter Washington, PhD past General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. and past president of Alcorn State University

Campus

Campus

Suburban

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