College Recruiting Information

College sports recruiting information that can help student-athletes get more college recruiting attention.

Recruiting Education

The recruitment process can be an overwhelming task if you are not prepared. Parents and student-athletes struggle each year with the notion of how to earn a college scholarship. This is why RecruitLook created “Recruit University”. A section dedicated to educating parents and athletes as they venture through the recruiting process.

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Recruiting Tips

There is more to getting an athletic scholarship than just being a good student-athlete. Recruits need to be knowledgeable on the educational topics we have covered in this section. Knowing the NCAA rules and regulations, how to apply for financial aid, college scholarship stats, and what to do on official visits will help while navigating the college recruiting process.

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College Recruiting Education

There is more to getting an athletic scholarship than just being a good student-athlete. Recruits need to be knowledgeable on the College Recruiting Education topics we have covered in this section. Knowing the NCAA rules and regulations, how to apply for financial aid, college scholarship stats, and what to do on official visits will help while navigating the college recruiting process. This section is dedicated to educating parents and athletes as they venture through the recruiting process.

The NCAA Eligibility Center certifies the academic and amateur credentials of all college-bound student-athletes who wish to compete in NCAA Division 1 or Division 2 athletics. Don’t jeopardize your chance to play college athletics, review this section!

Do you know in order to play college sports you need to meet certain requirements set forth by the NCAA? Make sure you are taking the right approach to ensure your eligibility. Every year recruits miss out on opportunities because they fail to meet the academic standards. Don’t let this happen to you!

NCAA Eligibility FAQs

The NCAA Eligibility Center is in place to make sure athletes and parents have an easier time understanding and navigating the eligibility steps that the NCAA requires. We have complied a list of the most common questions asked regarding the NCAA Eligibility Center.

NCAA Division 1 Sliding Scale

The NCAA Division One sliding scale is in place for those athletes that have lower GPA’s, but have higher ACT/SAT scores and vice-versa. This gives high school athletes some wiggle room to become eligible with the NCAA Eligibility Center.

NCAA Division 2 Sliding Scale

The NCAA Division Two sliding scale is in place for those athletes that have lower GPA’s, but have higher ACT/SAT scores and vice-versa. This gives high school athletes some wiggle room to become eligible with the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Division 1 Courses

The NCAA requires ALL potential division one athletes to pass certain core courses while in high school. If you do not, you will not be eligible to play NCAA division one athletics coming out of high school. It is very important to know what core courses are required by the NCAA.

Division 2 Courses

The NCAA requires ALL potential division two athletes to pass certain core courses while in high school. If you do not, you will not be eligible to play NCAA division two athletics coming out of high school. It is very important to know what core courses are required by the NCAA.

Division 3 Courses

The NCAA does not have as many rules in place for Division 3 institutions. This helps division three programs recruit more easily without as many restrictions. Make sure you know what the division three requirements are.

Understanding College Financial Aid

Not every high school athlete will receive an athletic scholarship. Having a financial backup plan for college is a great idea. There are plenty of other options available to help pay for your education. Financial aid is intended to make up the difference between what your family can afford to pay and what college costs. The majority of full-time students currently enrolled in college receive some type of financial aid to help pay college costs.

Federal Student Aid

Federal Student Aid plays a central and essential role in supporting post-secondary education by providing money for college to eligible students and families.

Financial Aid Borrowing Tips

Millions of high school students borrow money every year to help pay for college, but most borrow without reading these very important tips! Make sure you know what you are signing! These tips will prepare you with the process of applying for and borrowing money through financial aid.

What is FAFSA?

FAFSA is the application used by nearly all colleges and universities to determine eligibility for federal, state, and college-sponsored financial aid, including grants, educational loans, and work-study programs. This section covers how to start the FAFSA process and the documents you’ll need.

Estimated Family Contribution

All students are expected to contribute toward the cost of their college education. How much you and your family will be expected to contribute depends on your financial situation—and is what is referred to as your Expected Family Contribution or EFC.

College Loan Info

The cost of college rises each year a few percentages, which means most families need to take loans out to help pay for college. Nearly every student is eligible for some sort of financial aid, including loans. This section examines the different type of college loans.

NCAA Recruiting Terms

The NCAA has rules in place that limit a college recruiters exposure to high school athletes. Knowing what these terms mean will help athletes understand the recruiting process.

Breaking Down the NCAA Recruiting Terms

As you start getting information from colleges you will need to know why coaches can and cannot do certain things. The NCAA has rules in place that limit a college recruiter’s exposure to high school athletes. Knowing what the NCAA recruiting terms mean will help you understand recruiting process.

Contact

A contact is classified as a face-to-face encounter between a college coach and the student athlete (or their legal guardians or relatives) where more than a greeting occurs. Anything beyond a hello is considered a contact. Another form of contact occurs when a college coach has any contact with you or your legal guardians at your high school, or any other location where you are competing or practicing.

Contact Period

College coaches are allowed to have in-person contact with you or your legal guardians. This period means coaches can watch you compete anywhere, and the coach can write and make telephone calls.

Dead Period

The college coach cannot make in-person contact with you or your legal guardians. This prevents the coach from making any evaluations of you whatsoever. However, the coach can make telephone calls to you or your legal guardians.

Evaluation

This is the process where a coach watches you compete in a game or practice, and makes a note on your athletic abilities.

Evaluation Period

It is permissible for the college coach to evaluate your playing abilities at your high school or any other place where you are competing. During this period the coach cannot have off-campus in-person contact with you or your legal guardians. The coach can still make telephone calls to you or your legal guardians, and you are allowed to make campus visits during this period.

Quiet Period

During this time a college coach cannot watch you compete at any location. It is allowed for the college coach to make in-person contact with you or your legal guardians if it occurs on the coach’s campus. The coach can still make telephone calls to you or your legal guardians, and you can make visits to college campuses during this time.

Telephone Call

An electronically transmitted voice exchange is considered a phone call. That includes videoconferencing and videophones. Emails and faxes are not considered a phone call.

Official Visit

Any visit to a college that is paid for by that university. You and/or your legal guardians will have your transportation to and from the college paid for. Also paid for by the college will be your room, meals (three per day), and entertainment expenses. Generally, you will receive three free passes to that college’s home game the weekend you are in town.

Unofficial Visit

Anytime you or your legal guardians visit a college campus that is funded by you. You can take as many unofficial visits as you would like. During dead periods you cannot speak to any of the coaches while visiting the campus. Three free tickets to a home game is the only thing a coach can give you during an unofficial visit.

Some of the more frequently asked NCAA recruiting questions by parents and student-athletes about the recruiting process.

We have been helping athletes since 2008 get college scholarships. We have come across a lot of great questions, and in this section, we highlight some of the more common questions asked by families.

Do I have to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center?

Yes. All athletes who want to play Division I or Division II athletics are required to register with the eligibility center. If you do not then you cannot participate in athletics as a freshman.

When do I need to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center?

At the beginning of your junior year of high school. This will allow college coaches to have the most up-to-date information about you. You need to have your high school send your transcripts to the eligibility center after you have completed your junior year (or six semesters). You will need to follow the steps at the NCAA Clearinghouse to become eligible. Use RecruitLook’s clearinghouse feature to let coaches know of your eligibility status.

What is involved with the registration process?

There are a series of steps to follow when completing the registration. The eligibility center does an excellent job walking you through the process. Some information you will need to have is:

  • Social Security Number
  • Date of birth
  • Sports you plan on participating in
  • Your high school address
  • High school code number (get your code number from your counselor)
  • High School transcripts and SAT & ACT scores

Your high school has to be the one to send your transcripts. A very important rule change is that all SAT and ACT test scores must be reported directly from the testing agency. When you register for the SAT or ACT put the code of “9999″ to ensure your test scores get sent to the eligibility center. ACT and SAT scores are not accepted by the eligibility center if sent on your high school transcripts.

Does it cost to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center?

There is a processing fee of $50 ($75 for international students). The eligibility center only accepts debit card, credit card, or e-check. There is a possibility for a waiver in which you don’t have to pay the processing fee. In order to be eligible to waive the registration fee, you must have been granted a waiver for the ACT or SAT fee. If you weren’t then you can’t apply to have your eligibility registration fee waived.

What are core courses?

Core courses are a designated set of high school classes that must be completed to become eligible. They include the following subjects: English, Mathematics, Natural/Physical Science, Social Science, Foreign Language, non-doctrinal Religion or Philosophy. These courses have to meet your high schools standard academic level and have to be completed no later than your high school graduation date. You can get a list of courses from your high school counselor or at the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Can I use a core course taken after I graduated?

If you are enrolled in the NCAA Division 1 you can use only those courses completed in grades 9 through 12. An exception to the rule is when a student-athlete graduates on time (in eight semesters), they can use one core course completed in the summer or academic year after graduation. The course cannot be completed later than that academic year following the student-athlete’s graduation date. The course can be completed at a location other than your high school.

If you are enrolling in Division II you can use any courses that you complete prior to the start of your college career.

How is my GPA figured to determine my eligibility status?

Core course GPA is calculated differently than your high school GPA. The scale is on an A/B/C/D evaluation with an A worth 4.00, a B worth 3.00, a C worth 2.00, and a D worth 1.00. The eligibility center does not use plus or minuses (+, -) and the lowest grade you can earn is a D. The eligibility center uses a scale to measure the length of a class, and its value to your overall GPA. A trimester course is worth .33 units, a semester course is worth .5 units, and a year-long course is worth 1.0 unit. Only your best grades from the core courses will be used. You can include other core course scores if they improve your overall GPA. Here is an example for you to calculate your GPA:

An “A” in a semester course: 4 x .5 = 2 quality points and .5 credits earned
A “B” in a year course: 3 x 1 = 3 quality point and 1 credit earned
A “C” in a trimester course: 2 x .33 = .66 quality points and .33 credits earned
A “B” in a semester course: 3 x .5 = 1.5 quality points and .5 credits earned

The next step is to calculate your grade point average. Add up your quality points and divide them by the number of credits you have earned. For this example it would be:

7.16 quality points (.5+3+.66+1.5) divided by 2.33 credits earn (.5+1+.33+.5) for a GPA of 3.07

What are the core courses that I need to take to become eligible for Division I and Division II?

You can find that information on this page, under “NCAA Eligibility Info”.

What is a sliding scale?

It is a scale that allows you to have lower test scores but a higher GPA and vice versa to qualify for your academic eligibility. If your GPA is very high then your ACT and SAT test scores can be relatively low and you can still be eligible. You need to make sure you fall within this scale provided by the NCAA. You can find the sliding scale information on this page under “NCAA Eligibility Info”.

What is the sum score that is mentioned when determining my ACT or SAT scores?

You are allowed to take both tests more than once. The NCAA will let you take the best scores from each test and combine them to make the best possible sum of scores. For example: if you took the SAT in January and got 420 Math and 380 Verbal that gives you a total of 800. The next time you take the test in May you get a 350 Math and a 490 Verbal than your score is 840. However, with the sum score formula, you can combine the best scores from both tests to get a 420 Math and a 490 Verbal for a sum score of 910.

Why is there no talk about Division III and the eligibility center?

NCAA Division III does not use the Eligibility Center. Any questions on academic requirements need to be directed to that college institution.

Red Shirt / Green Shirt / Gray Shirt

You hear the phrases tossed around all the time, but what do they actually mean? Recruits should know what red shirting, green shirting, and gray shirting is before they make their way to a college campus.

Red Shirting

A red shirt athlete does not compete in any competition for a full academic year, which will maintain their four seasons of college eligibility.

If a college athlete plays in even just a minute of one game or match against another team, they can no longer be red-shirted.

Green Shirting

The term is used for Fall sport athletes (primarily in football) who graduate from high school a semester early. The reason is to enroll in college and participate in spring practice in their sport so that they can learn the plays, train with their team, and start attending classes before their initial Fall season.

Gray Shirting

This term is used to designate a high school athlete who is delaying their initial enrollment in a college. The athlete, usually an NCAA Division I football athlete, doesn’t enroll in college in the Fall immediately after high school graduation, but will delay enrollment until the Spring semester. The advantage in gray shirting is giving the player an additional spring semester to use during their eligibility. So, rather than entering school during the semester in which competition will begin, you enter the school in a spring semester giving you more preparation time before your first semester of competitive play.

What does the grey shirt mean to the individual athlete? Typically, the athlete goes to junior college where they can begin taking college courses. The athlete can not take 12 credits or more. Taking 12 credits or more of college courses will essentially start that athlete’s “eligibility clock”. Athletes are also responsible for paying for the classes they are taking at the junior college.

Any high school athlete looking to play college sports must take the ACT and/or SAT. Receiving high test scores will increase a recruit’s chances of an athletic and/or academic scholarship.

Having good grades can significantly increase your chances of a college scholarship. College coaches are looking for players that are smart and won’t be an issue to qualify academically. Make sure you know how important the ACT and SAT are in the college recruiting process.

What Athletes Need to Know About the SAT

The SAT is designed to assess your academic readiness for college.

Go to www.collegeboard.com and register to take the SAT.

  • – Colleges require that you take the SAT Reasoning Test. You may also be interested in the
    SAT Subject Test as they offer you additional opportunity to show college what you know and what you know you can do.
  • – Many colleges use the SAT Subject Tests for admission, for course placement, and to advise students about course selection. Some colleges specify the SAT Subject Tests that they require for admission or placement; other allow applicants to choose which tests to take.
  • – The SAT test on reading (reading passages and sentence completions), writing (short essay and multiple-choice questions on identifying errors and improving grammar and usage) and math (questions on arithmetic operations, algebra, geometry, statistics and probability) that you learn in school and that are critical for success in college and beyond. It gives both you and colleges a sense of how you’ll be able to apply the thinking, writing and study skills required for college course work.
  • – The SAT also provides the opportunity for you to connect to scholarship opportunities, place out of certain college courses and learn more about your academic strengths.
  • – The SAT tests are offered several times a year. Most students take the SAT for the first time during the spring of their junior year and a second time during the fall of their senior year.
  • – It is a good idea to practice before taking your SAT. The College Board website has free practice tests as well as study guides available to purchase. For more help visit: CollegeBoard.org/Practice
  • IMPORTANT: On the day of the SAT you will have to have an admission ticket to write your SAT. Print this out from the College Board website when you register. Bring it to the testing center where you will be taking your SAT.
  • IMPORTANT: Your SAT scores have to be sent to the NCAA Eligibility Center. Use code 9999 when filling out your form so they get sent there.

What Athletes Need to Know About the ACT

The ACT test assesses high school students’ general educational development and their ability to complete college-level work.

Go to www.actstudent.org and register to take the ACT.

  • – The multiple-choice tests cover four skill areas: English, mathematics, reading, and science.
  • – The Writing Test, which is optional, measures skill in planning and writing a short essay.
  • – The ACT includes 215 multiple-choice questions and takes approximately 3 hours and 30 minutes to complete, including a short break (or just over four hours if you are taking the ACT Plus Writing).
  • – The main four tests are scored individually on a scale of 1-36, and a composite score is provided which is the whole number average of the four scores.
  • – The ACT is administered on six test dates within the United States each year, and you cannot take the ACT more than 12 times.
  • – Basic registration to take the ACT cost $36.50
  • – For practice visit the ACT Test Prep Center: Click Here
  • – IMPORTANT: Your ACT scores have to be sent to the NCAA Eligibility Center. Use code 9999 when filling out your form so they get sent there.
  • – IMPORTANT: After registering, print your admission ticket. You will need your admission ticket, and your Personal ID to be allowed to take the test.

Official & Unofficial Visits, Verbal Offers, Walk-ons, National Letter of Intent

As a high school student-athlete looking for a college scholarship you must be aware of Official and Unofficial Visits to college campuses, as well as what it means to walk-on, and what is entailed with a National Letter of Intent. It is important as you become a college prospect that you take visits to see what each college has to offer. Things you can check out on your visit are the athletic facilities, the layout of the campus, the atmosphere of the school on game day, and meeting the coaching staff. It is important as you become a college prospect that you fully understand how to use official and unofficial visits to your benefit. The media has really taken to offers and recruits signing national letters of intent, so we examine what those mean in the recruiting process.

National Letter of Intents

By signing a National Letter of Intent, a prospective student-athlete agrees to attend the designated college or university. The National Letter of Intent has many advantages to both prospective student-athletes and participating educational institutions. Find out what they are.

Verbal Offers

A verbal offer is a commitment to a school before the student-athlete signs a National Letter of Intent. The commitment is NOT binding on either the high school athlete or the college. So what does that mean?

College Walk-On

Walking-on to play college sports is very common. Athletes are finding the opportunity to walk-on a better option than playing at a school that isn’t a good fit. What does it mean to be a college walk-on?

Official Visits

If you are taking official visits to colleges, you are high on a college’s recruiting board. This is a great sign if you are a recruit. What are official visits, and what should you expect on your visit?

Unofficial Visits

Unofficial visits are a great opportunity to learn more about schools you are wanting to possibly attend. Recruits should take unofficial visits throughout high school. How can recruits use an unofficial visit to their recruiting advantage?

Sport-by-Sport Scholarship Stats

It’s important for high school athletes to know how many athletic scholarships are available for their sport. Not every athlete is going to play division one athletics; therefore, it is important to know what college levels offer a scholarship opportunity.

What are the odds of you playing College or Pro Sports?

Most high school athletes have the goal of playing sports in college, but what are the odds of playing college sports? There are millions of high school athletes across the country seeking college scholarships, but the truth is, there just aren’t that many spots available in college. It gets even more limited when trying to go from college to professional.

Football Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering football scholarships

  • NCAA FBS = 120
  • NCAA FCS = 118
  • NCAA Division III = 239 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 91
  • Junior College = 69

Number of available football scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA FBS = 85
  • NCAA FCS = 63
  • NCAA Division III = 0
  • NAIA = 24
  • Junior College = 85

Men’s Basketball Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering basketball scholarships

  • NCAA Division I = 346
  • NCAA Division II = 289
  • NCAA Division III = 416 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA Division I = 112
  • NAIA Division II = 148
  • Junior College = 434

Number of available basketball scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA Division I = 13
  • NCAA Division II = 10
  • NCAA Division III = 0
  • NAIA Division I = 11
  • NAIA Division II = 6
  • Junior College = 15

Women’s Basketball Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering women’s basketball scholarships

  • NCAA Division I = 344
  • NCAA Division II = 290
  • NCAA Division III = 439 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA Division I = 111
  • NAIA Division II = 148
  • Junior College = 397

Number of available women’s basketball scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA Division I = 15
  • NCAA Division II = 10
  • NCAA Division III = 0
  • NAIA Division I = 11
  • NAIA Division II = 6
  • Junior College = 15

Baseball Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering baseball scholarships

  • NCAA Division I = 298
  • NCAA Division II = 259
  • NCAA Division III = 374 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 212
  • Junior College = 511

Number of available baseball scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA Division I = 11.7
  • NCAA Division II = 9
  • NCAA Division III = 0
  • NAIA = 12
  • Junior College = 24

Cross Country Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering cross country scholarships

  • NCAA Division I = TBD
  • NCAA Division II = TBD
  • NCAA Division III = TBD (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = TBD
  • Junior College = TBD

Number of available cross country scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA Division I = TBD
  • NCAA Division II = TBD
  • NCAA Division III = TBD
  • NAIA = TBD
  • Junior College = TBD

Field Hockey Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering field hockey scholarships

  • NCAA Division I = 79
  • NCAA Division II = 26
  • NCAA Division III = 158 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)

Number of available field hockey scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA Division I = 12
  • NCAA Division II = 6.3
  • NCAA Division III = 0

Golf Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering Men’s golf scholarships

  • NCAA Division I = 300
  • NCAA Division II = 231
  • NCAA Division III = 293 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 170
  • Junior College = 193

Number of schools offering Women’s golf scholarships

  • NCAA Division I = 263
  • NCAA Division II = 181
  • NCAA Division III = 184 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 146
  • Junior College = 54

Number of available Men’s golf scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA Division I = 4.5
  • NCAA Division II = 3.6
  • NCAA Division III = 0
  • NAIA = 5
  • Junior College = 8 (varies per school)

Golf is an equivalency sport for NCAA scholarship purposes, so partial scholarships can be awarded to meet the limit per school. For example, an NCAA Division I school can award 9 male golfers each a 1/2 scholarship and still meet the limit of 4.5 per school.

Number of available Women’s golf scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA Division I = 6
  • NCAA Division II = 5.4
  • NCAA Division III = 0
  • NAIA = 5
  • Junior College = 8 (varies per school)

Golf is an equivalency sport for NCAA scholarship purposes, so partial scholarships can be awarded to meet the limit per school. For example, an NCAA Division I school can award 12 female golfers each a 1/2 scholarship and still meet the limit of 6 per school.

Men's Lacrosse Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering men’s lacrosse scholarships

  • NCAA Division I = 60
  • NCAA Division II = 38
  • NCAA Division III = 166 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • Junior College = 44

Number of available men’s lacrosse scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA Division I = 12.6
  • NCAA Division II = 10.8
  • NCAA Division III = 0 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • Junior College = 20 (varies per school)

Women's Lacrosse Scholarship Stats


Number of schools offering women’s lacrosse scholarships

  • NCAA Division I = 91
  • NCAA Division II = 54
  • NCAA Division III = 202 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • Junior College = 17

Number of available women’s lacrosse scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA Division I = 12
  • NCAA Division II = 9.9
  • NCAA Division III = 0 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • Junior College = 20 (varies per school)

Men's Ice Hockey Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering men’s ice hockey scholarships

  • NCAA Division I = 58
  • NCAA Division II = 6
  • NCAA Division III = 72 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NJCAA = 9
  • ACHA = 346

Number of available men’s ice hockey scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA Division I = 18
  • NCAA Division II = 13.5
  • NCAA Division III = 0 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NJCAA = 16

Women's Ice Hockey Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering women’s ice hockey scholarships

  • NCAA Division I = 35
  • NCAA Division II = 2
  • NCAA Division III = 47 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • ACHA = 46

Number of available women’s ice hockey scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA Division I = 18
  • NCAA Division II = 18
  • NCAA Division III = 0 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)

Soccer Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering soccer scholarships

Men’s Soccer:

  • NCAA Division I = 204
  • NCAA Division II = 181
  • NCAA Division III = 407 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 218
  • Junior College = 221

Women’s Soccer:

  • NCAA Division I = 322
  • NCAA Division II = 228
  • NCAA Division III = 428 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 219
  • Junior College = 186

Number of available soccer scholarships (per school) at each level

Men’s Soccer:

  • NCAA Division I = 9.9
  • NCAA Division II = 9
  • NCAA Division III = 0 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 12
  • Junior College = 18

Women’s Soccer:

  • NCAA Division I = 14
  • NCAA Division II = 9.9
  • NCAA Division III = 0 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 12
  • Junior College = 18

Softball Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering softball scholarships

  • NCAA Division I = 289
  • NCAA Division II = 268
  • NCAA Division III = 411 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 210
  • Junior College = 361

Number of available softball scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA Division I = 12
  • NCAA Division II = 7.2
  • NCAA Division III = 0
  • NAIA = 10
  • Junior College = 24 (varies per school)

Swimming Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering swimming scholarships

Men’s Swimming:

  • NCAA Division I = 143
  • NCAA Division II = 58
  • NCAA Division III = 200 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 22
  • Junior College = 20

Women’s Swimming:

  • NCAA Division I = 200
  • NCAA Division II = 77
  • NCAA Division III = 242 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 31
  • Junior College = 21

Number of available swimming scholarships (per school) at each level

Men’s Swimming:

  • NCAA Division I = 9.9
  • NCAA Division II = 8.1
  • NCAA Division III = 0
  • NAIA = 8
  • Junior College = 15 (varies per school)

Women’s Swimming:

  • NCAA Division I = 14
  • NCAA Division II = 8.1
  • NCAA Division III = 0
  • NAIA = 8
  • Junior College = 15 (varies per school)

Tennis Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering tennis scholarships

  • NCAA Division I = 264
  • NCAA Division II = 167
  • NCAA Division III = 328 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 102
  • Junior College = 77

Number of available tennis scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA Division I = 4.5
  • NCAA Division II = 4.5
  • NCAA Division III = 0 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 5
  • Junior College = 0

Track and Field Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering track and field scholarships

Men’s Track & Field:

  • NCAA Division I = 279
  • NCAA Division II = 164
  • NCAA Division III = 271 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 157
  • Junior College = 78

Women’s Track & Field:

  • NCAA Division I = 319
  • NCAA Division II = 175
  • NCAA Division III = 279 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 162
  • Junior College = 82

Number of available track & field scholarships (per school) at each level

Men’s Track & Field:

  • NCAA Division I = 12.6
  • NCAA Division II = 12.6
  • NCAA Division III = 0 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 12
  • Junior College = 20

Women’s Track & Field:

  • NCAA Division I = 18
  • NCAA Division II = 12.6
  • NCAA Division III = 0 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 12
  • Junior College = 20

Volleyball Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering volleyball scholarships

  • NCAA Division I = 329
  • NCAA Division II = 277
  • NCAA Division III = 430(however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 240
  • Junior College = 303

Number of available volleyball scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA Division I = 12
  • NCAA Division II = 8
  • NCAA Division III = 0
  • NAIA = 8
  • Junior College = 14 (varies per school)

Water Polo Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering water polo scholarships

Men’s Water Polo:

  • NCAA Division I = 21
  • NCAA Division II = 9
  • NCAA Division III = 16 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)

Women’s Water Polo:

  • NCAA Division I = 31
  • NCAA Division II = 10
  • NCAA Division III = 20 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)

Number of available water polo scholarships (per school) at each level

Men’s Water Polo:

  • NCAA Division I = 4.5
  • NCAA Division II = 4.5
  • NCAA Division III = 0 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)

Women’s Water Polo:

  • NCAA Division I = 8
  • NCAA Division II = 8
  • NCAA Division III = 0 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)

Wrestling Scholarship Stats

Number of schools offering wrestling scholarships

  • NCAA Division I = 84
  • NCAA Division II = 47
  • NCAA Division III = 89 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 38
  • Junior College = 44

Number of available wrestling scholarships (per school) at each level

  • NCAA Division I = 9.9
  • NCAA Division II = 9
  • NCAA Division III = 0 (however D3 schools don’t offer athletic scholarships)
  • NAIA = 8
  • Junior College = 16 (varies per school)

NAIA Recruiting Information

The NAIA is a great association for student-athletes looking to compete at a high level. The NAIA offers championships in 13 different men’s and women’s sports, and awards more than $450 million dollars in financial aid each year. Find out more information about what the NAIA has to offer.

The NAIA recruiting information is less cumbersome, with few restrictions on the contact between a student-athlete and a college coach. This levels the playing field for NAIA institutions to compete against NCAA schools.

The NAIA has around 300 colleges and universities. The appeal that the NAIA has to offer is their smaller class sizes and tight-knit campus communities, the ability to transfer and not lose any eligibility, there are fewer recruiting rules and restrictions, and you have the opportunity to compete for championships. Not everyone has the ability or academics to play NCAA sports. The NAIA is a terrific chance for any student-athlete looking to earn a scholarship.

Each NAIA institution will have its own academic requirements that you must meet, and the NAIA association has an overview of recruiting rules and requirements that student-athletes must meet.

Student-athletes must meet 2 of the 3 requirements below in order to be eligible for the NAIA...

  1. Achieve a minimum of 18 on the ACT or 860 on the SAT.
  2. Achieve a minimum overall high school GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale.
  3. Graduate in the top half of your graduating class.

If you are looking to play college athletics at the NAIA level, you must follow these steps.

  1. Register with the NAIA Eligibility Center and pay the $70 fee ($120 for international students).
  2. Submit your info: contact info, address, high school attended, sport(s) played.
  3. Insert the code: 9876 when taking the ACT and/or SAT on the lists of places test scores should be sent.
  4. Have your guidance counselor send your official transcripts to the NAIA Eligibility Center (address below)

NAIA Eligibility Center – Transcripts
P.O. Box 15340
Kansas City, MO 64106

The NAIA and NCAA are two separate associations, with different rules and eligibility process. Your eligibility with the NCAA is separate from your eligibility with the NAIA.

Quick Facts About The NAIA

  1. The NAIA sponsors 13 sports and determines 23 national championships.
  2. 60,000 student athletes compete at NAIA member schools.
  3. There are nearly 300 NAIA colleges and universities.
  4. NAIA schools award more than $500 million in financial aid each year.

Does The NAIA have national letters of intent?

As an association, the NAIA does not have a letter of intent program in which students sign a binding agreement to participate in athletics at a particular institution. Student-athletes may sign letters of intent with an individual NAIA school, however, they aren’t obligated to attend that institution. That said, some NAIA conferences require their member schools to recognize letters of intent that are signed with other institutions within the conference. Please check with your prospective school to see if any conference programs apply.

What are the amount of scholarships awarded at the NAIA level?

Each sport has scholarship limits set by the NAIA, but those scholarships can be dispensed as partial awards to spread financial aid around among athletes. Each sport has an overall limit on the amount of financial aid it can award as full or partial.

For example, the overall limit in Track & Field is 12. Track & Field scholarships can be awarded to any number of students (for example, 2 full scholarship, 9 half awards and 24 quarter awards) as long as the combined total does not exceed 12.

Limits on the total amount of aid that can be given to varsity athletes in each sport...

Baseball = 12 scholarships
Golf = 5 scholarships
Tennis = 5 scholarships
Basketball (Division I) = 11 scholarships
Basketball (Division II) = 6 scholarships
Softball = 10 scholarships
Wrestling = 8 scholarships
Soccer = 12 scholarships
Track & Field = 12 scholarships
Cross Country = 5 scholarships
Swimming & Diving = 8 scholarships
Volleyball = 8 scholarships
Football = 24 scholarships

Junior College Recruiting Information

The NJCAA route (often known as JUCO) is a great opportunity for those athletes that didn’t qualify academically or looking to improve their skill set. There are over 525 NJCAA institutions with nearly 60,000 student-athletes. Learn more about the recruiting of a JUCO athlete.

National Junior College Athletic Association

Going the junior college route gives you the opportunity to improve your athletic skills while earning credits toward a degree. You can transfer after two years, and still, have two years of playing eligibility. Many coaches are now looking for junior college prospects to come in and compete right away.

The NJCAA serves as the national governing body for two-year college athletics in the United States and is the nation’s second-largest national intercollegiate sports organization (second to the NCAA). Each year nearly 60,000 student-athletes from 525 member colleges compete in 28 different sports.

What are the eligibility requirements for junior college?

  • ● Every student must be a high school graduate with an academic diploma, general education diploma or a State Department of Education approved high school equivalency test.
  • ● Each institution is different when it comes to academic eligibility requirements. It is recommended that each potential student-athlete discuss their athletic eligibility with the specific college.

What are the junior college recruiting rules?

  • ● No institution shall permit an athlete to be solicited to attend by the promise of a gift or inducement other than an athletic scholarship.
  • ● An institution may pay for one visit to its campus by direct route, for a stay not to exceed two days and two nights. The paid visit must be limited to the campus and local community where the college is located.
  • ● A student-athlete must have completed his/her junior year in high school in order to receive an official recruiting visit by a member NJCAA college.
  • ● While recruiting a potential athlete on campus, a college representative may purchase meals for the athlete. The value of the meals may not exceed the amount provided to a college employee while traveling on college business.

Does the NJCAA have National Letter of Intents?

The NJCAA Letter of Intent is used to commit an individual to a specific institution for a period of one academic year. The form is only valid for NJCAA member colleges and has no jurisdiction over NCAA or NAIA colleges. The student may not, however, sign an NJCAA Letter of Intent with two NJCAA colleges. If a student does sign with two NJCAA colleges, that student will become immediately ineligible to compete in NJCAA competition for the next academic year in any sport.

What type of scholarship funds can NJCAA schools offer?

Each institution belonging to the NJCAA can choose to compete on the Division I, II or III level in designated sports.

  • Division I colleges may offer full athletic scholarships
  • Division II colleges are limited to awarding tuition, fees, books and up to $250 in course required supplies
  • Division III institutions may provide no athletically related financial assistance.

What sports are offered by the NJCAA?

The NJCAA provides opportunities for participation, including National Championships, for student-athletes in the following sports:

  • ● Fall Baseball – Men’s
  • ● Spring Baseball – Men’s
  • ● Basketball – Men/Women
  • ● Bowling – Men/Women
  • ● Cross Country – Men/Women
  • ● Football – Men’s
  • ● Fall Golf – Men/Women
  • ● Spring Golf – Men/Women
  • ● Half Marathon – Men/Women
  • ● Ice Hockey – Men’s
  • ● Indoor Track and Field – Men/Women
  • ● Outdoor Track and Field – Men/Women
  • ● Spring Lacrosse – Men/Women
  • ● Fall Lacrosse – Men/Women
  • ● Fall Softball – Women’s
  • ● Spring Softball – Women’s
  • ● Fall Soccer – Men/Women
  • ● Spring Soccer – Men/Women
  • ● Swimming & Diving – Men/Women
  • ● Fall Tennis – Men/Women
  • ● Spring Tennis – Men/Women
  • ● Fall Volleyball – Women’s
  • ● Spring Volleyball – Women’s
  • ● Wrestling – Men’s

NCAA Transfer Rules

The NCAA transfer rules are confusing to understand. We’ll try to simply for athletes and parents what you need to know when transferring. This guide will determine what kind of transfer you are, and the path that you need to take.

How to Make Sure You Are a Transfer Athlete

There are a number of conditions, some more common than others, which make you a transfer.

Common Ways That an Athlete Can Trigger Transfer Status

To be a transfer, you meet one of the conditions in these lists at one school, and then enroll at another school. Here are the common ways to trigger transfer status: (from most common to least common)

  1. You were officially enrolled full-time for a regular term (fall or spring semester, fall, winter, or spring quarter) and present at the school on the first day of classes for that term (this is most common)
  2. You reported for a regular squad practice prior to the start of classes (this is second most common)
  3. You participated in practice or competed even if you were not enrolled full-time (this is third most common)

Less Common Ways That an Athlete Might Trigger Transfer Status

  • You attended a class while enrolled full-time, even if you were only provisionally admitted and later denied admission
  • You attend a night school enrolled full-time if the night school has the same terms as the institution’s day school and considers you to be a regular full-time student
  • You received financial aid from the school to attend summer school prior to starting classes (unless you are denied admissions).

How to Know What Type of Transfer You Are

Once you are considered a transfer student, you must know what type of transfer student you are in order to make sure you comply with the correct set of requirements.

2-4 Transfers (Junior College or Community College Transfer)

A 2-4 transfer is a transfer from a two-year college (junior or community college) to a four-year college. There are two different types of 2-4 transfers with different requirements to play right away.

A 2-4 qualifier transfer is a transfer from a two-year college who has been certified by the NCAA Eligibility Center as a final academic qualifier. If an athlete has not been certified yet as a qualifier, he or she may go through the Eligibility Center process after starting at the two-year college. However, an athlete may not use any course work or standardized tests (SAT/ACT) taken after starting college to become a qualifier.

Non-Qualifiers 2-4 Transfers

A 2-4 non-qualifier transfer is a transfer from a two-year college who has not been certified by the NCAA Eligibility Center as a final academic qualifier. This includes athletes who received final certification in Divisions One and Two, athletes who received final certification in Division Two, and athletes who have not received any final certification from the Eligibility Center.

4-4 Transfers (Four Year Transfer)

A 4-4 transfer is a transfer from one four-year college to another four-year college. This includes transfers from one NCAA school to another, transfers from NAIA schools to NCAA schools (or vice versa) and transfers from colleges that do not offer athletics (like international colleges) to NCAA or NAIA schools.

4-2-4 Transfers

A 4-2-4 transfer is a transfer from a four-year college to a two-year college then to another four-year college. In Division One, 4-2-4 transfers have an entirely separate set of transfer rules. In Division Two, the 4-2-4 transfer rules are mixed up with the 2-4 transfer rules and are most similar to the rules that apply to non-qualifiers.

This guide is designed to explain the NCAA transfer rules for college student-athletes. This will help breakdown the process athletes will go through when determining their eligibility should they decide to transfer. RecruitLook has outlined the information to assist you in determining what kind of transfer you are and what you’ll need to do.

NCAA Four Year Transfer Rules

Transferring from one 4-year school to another 4-year school, also known as 4-4 transfer, is one of the more complex situations for an athlete when looking to transfer. There has been a significant jump in athletes transferring schools recently, and RecruitLook Scouts think a lot has to do with the lack of research athletes do when making a decision on college. Too many athletes focus in on going to a school based on the name on the jersey and not what is the best fit for the athlete.

Here is information to help athletes know what their rights are, and to make sure they are eligible once the transfer is complete.

Junior College Transfer Rules

Junior college transfer rules, also known as 2-4 transfers, are not as abstruse as the NCAA 4-year transfer rules. However, it is critical you get the athletic departments from both the school you are transferring from and to involved early.

The information below better explains the transfer process based on your transfer status as a qualifier or non-qualifier. You cannot transfer on your own, you will need to enlist the help of your athletic department.

NCAA Transfer Exceptions

The NCAA transfer process is full of rules and regulations that can determine when and where athletes are eligible to transfer. It gets even murkier when scholarship monies start to get discussed. Below are some exceptions and petitions you can file to receive a more favorable outcome.

College Athlete Transfers Known As 4-2-4

Transferring from one 4-year school to JUCO and back to another 4-year school is known as a 4-2-4 transfer. This is common in college athletics nowadays. Several factors might be the cause as to why athletes transfer, but the goal of the transfer is ultimately to get a fresh start.

Once you get to college as a recruited athlete, college coaches in most cases stop tracking you; therefore, going the Junior College route is a great option to build up your recruiting ranking again. If you were at a 4-year school and didn’t see much action — college coaches don’t want to go back and recruit you based on your highlight resume and video. They’ll want to see you compete at the college level and JUCO is that option.

Here is information to help athletes know what their rights are, and to make sure they are eligible once the transfer is complete.

College Recruiting Tips For Athletes

The recruitment process can be an overwhelming task if you are not prepared; therefore, this section is dedicated to providing college recruiting tips for athletes. Parents and student-athletes struggle each year with the notion of how to earn a college scholarship. This section is dedicated to educating parents and athletes as they venture through the recruiting process.

Earning a full-ride athletic scholarship is every high school athlete’s dream.

Most athletes think that in order to get into college, all they have to do is perform well on the field or court. Performance is only a small fraction of the recruiting process. Sure, you have to be a good athlete to play college sports; however, there are a lot of other items athletes must consider in order to land that coveted scholarship offer.</p> <p>Trying to get to that point of receiving scholarship offers is the challenge most athletes face today. There are several factors that athletes should consider when trying to get noticed. Here are some sports recruiting tips that will help you during the recruiting process.

Are you getting recruited?

Athletes have a hard time distinguishing what the level of recruiting interest they are actually receiving. Throughout high school, athletes will receive different recruiting interest from college coaches. It is important to know what all of it means. Click below to learn more about each grade level, the recruitment tactic, and what it means for an athlete’s recruiting.

Freshman Year Recruiting

As you progress through high school you will need to know more about the recruitment process. However, for now, we need to prepare you for the next 4 years. Here are a few pointers that will help you prepare for the future.

Sophomore Year Recruiting

You will begin receiving brochures, questionnaires, and other collegiate information from college recruiters. Although coaches are limited with how they can contact you, you will still be getting evaluated on the field. Here are some pointers to get you prepared.

Junior Year Recruiting

Your junior year is the most critical year in the recruiting process. College coaches are spending majority of their recruiting efforts on junior recruiting classes. Be prepared!

Senior Year Recruiting

You need to stay focused on earning an athletic scholarship. If you are just now starting the recruiting process then you are a bit behind schedule; however, there is still time to get noticed. Let’s look at what athletes should be doing their senior season.

Student-athletes need to proactively market their skills in order to get seen by college coaches.

There is more to getting an athletic scholarship than just being a good student-athlete. Recruits need to be knowledgeable on the educational topics we have covered in this section. Knowing the NCAA rules and regulations, how to apply for financial aid, college scholarship stats, and what to do on official visits will help while navigating the college recruiting process. We are dedicated to educating parents and athletes as they venture through the recruiting process. This section examines how athletes should start and carry out their marketing plan.

When should athletes start the college recruiting process?

It is essential for athletes to be proactive with their college recruitment. There is a lot of competition for a limited amount of scholarship money. It is the athletes that can effectively execute a marketing campaign that will receive the most recruiting attention. Make sure you know how to get recruited.

The earlier you start the better off you will be. You definitely do not want to wait until your senior year. Ideally, you should start prepping your sophomore year in high school, and by the time you are a junior, your marketing plan will be in full swing. The NCAA has rules that prohibit college recruiters from contacting high school athletes until they are finished with their junior year (emails are okay as a junior).

You can contact coaches via email or phone as a sophomore, and coaches can send you questionnaires and brochures about camps; however, the real recruiting starts when you become a junior in high school. That is when coaches start deciding what they need for the upcoming recruiting classes. Coaches begin to take more of an interest in your highlight videos and start to follow your press clippings as you become a legit prospect. The competitiveness of the recruiting game has changed with the advancements of technology. If you are not out there marketing your skills then there is a good chance that you’ll be looked over.

When your junior year begins you should email your recruiting profile to the schools on your target list. Depending on responses you can follow up with a phone call. Don’t sit back and hope college scouts are going to discover you; you need to be proactive and get your name out there early your junior year. Deciding on a school doesn’t happen overnight. It is a process and you want to allow plenty of time in case your target schools aren’t interested.

How to Start Your Recruiting

Each year thousands of athletes are going off to college on an athletic or academic scholarship, and those athletes all had to navigate the college recruiting process. Despite the ups and downs over the course of your athletic career, there are some necessary steps you can take to make sure you are in a good position to get a scholarship offer. There are many twists and turns throughout the process, but there are several things every high school athlete can do to get their college recruiting started. Find out what you need to do!

Online Recruiting Profile

Every college coach has used the internet in some form or fashion to recruit. That means it is important for athletes to have a recruiting profile that showcases their talents.

Target the Right Schools

It is important that you do some research on schools that are on your target list. A very small percentage of college athletes go on to play professionally, but they do go on to become professionals in some field.

Recruiting Questionnaire

Recruiting Questionnaires are important when athletes begin to research and contact schools. College coaches use these forms to recruit. Read why recruiting questionnaires are important, and read what college coaches had to say about the questionnaires.

Highlight Videos

It’s difficult for coaches to travel all over the country to see recruits play. The easiest solution to get around coaches’ busy lifestyle – send them a highlight video. It is much more convenient for a coach to sit in his office and watch a 3-5 minute video of you then it is to travel across the country. Read how to create the perfect video.

Contacting College Coaches

You have done everything you need to do to begin the college recruiting process. You now need to let the college coaches know how good you are on the field and in the classroom. There is a right way and a wrong to do that. How should athletes first contact a college coach?

Keeping in contact with college coaches is an essential part of the college recruiting process.

Coaches get busy throughout the year and can’t always keep up with contacting recruits. Recruits need to be proactive to keep the communication lines open and not to slip off the radar. In order to stay on the radar and ahead of other recruits you need to do things that others might not be doing. What kind of communication efforts should recruits be doing?

Texting

The NCAA rules on texting have changed to allow for more communication between college coaches and recruits. Coaches are using texting to frequently keep tabs on potential recruiting targets. There are some important rules to follow when texting with a college coach.

Calling

This is your best way to get answers from a coach while being able to develop a friendship/relationship with them, and getting the coaches to trust in you and to let them know you genuinely care about their program. What kind of conversations can an athlete expect from a college coach?

When Is the Best Time to Call a College Coach?

College coaches are extremely busy throughout the course of a day and/or week. There are strategies recruits should consider when attempting to make contact with a college coach. Find out the secrets.

What Questions Can an Athlete Expect to Hear from a College Coach?

A college coach is going to have certain questions that they’ll ask when talking with potential recruits. It is smart to be prepared for the conversation. It is important for the recruit to have a basic understanding of what questions the college coach is going to ask.

What Questions Should Athletes Ask College Coaches?

Recruits should have certain questions prepared to ask college coaches in order to learn more about the school and sports program. Getting important answers from college scouts will help in an athlete’s athletic recruitment process.

Our staff of former athletes, high school coaches, and college coaches wanted to share some important recruiting tips with you.

RecruitLook Scouts have years of experience in and around the college recruiting game. We wanted to share some of our thoughts and experiences with all the recruits and families out there. These are ideas, insights, and recruiting tips that what we believe every student-athlete should be made aware of.

Know Your Recruiting Potential

Many recruits like to think that they are division one talent, but the market is saying they are division two or lower; however, recruits still only try to land division one scholarships. That is not a good strategy. You are limiting your opportunities. How can you avoid this scenario?

No Scholarship? Here’s Why

Most recruits think that if they are good that a college scout will find them, and that their athletic ability is what will land them a college scholarship. College scouts are looking for more than just a talented athlete. Here are 3 very common reasons recruits get overlooked.

About Email Blasting…

Sending out emails is a crucial step in the college recruiting process. However, many recruits fall victim of recruiting services that promise to send out thousands of emails on the recruit’s behalf. This is a major red flag and college coaches hate it!

College Recruiting Budgets

Each university or college has a different recruiting budget for the year. The division one schools will have bigger budgets than division two schools, and athletic programs will give money making sports more money for recruiting. It is important to know how a school’s recruiting budget plays a role in your recruitment!

Have Recruiting Options

One of the biggest mistakes an athlete can make during the college recruiting process is limiting their recruiting options. College coaches are talking with multiple recruits, and athletes should be doing the same with college coaches. How can you boost your college recruiting options?

College Recruiting Stories

No two athletes will follow the exact same steps to get a scholarship offer. There will be similarities but each athlete is unique. The RecruitLook staff has helped athletes receive millions of dollars in scholarship money. We wanted to share a few of the success stories* that RecruitLook athletes have had.

*Names and schools have been changed for confidentiality purposes.

Negotiating a College Scholarship

This case study highlights how to properly negotiate with college coaches to get the best possible scholarship offer available. Many families think the first offer is the only offer. We have the right strategy to ensure you get multiple offers!

Late Starting Your Recruitment

Athletes will put off their college recruitment thinking they’ll either eventually get discovered, or that they can get it all done during their senior year. College coaches start recruiting as young as 9th grade! How do athletes overcome starting the college recruiting process late?

The Right Recruiting Strategy

You always hear about the good athlete that is getting zero recruiting attention. It happens every year! Most time, the athlete’s recruiting plan to get college coaches to notice him/her is horribly planned out. The right recruiting strategy will significantly increase your scholarship offers.

Lack of Recruiting Attention

There are many factors that might attribute to why a recruit is not getting the recruiting attention they deserve. RecruitLook Scouts see top talent get passed over year-after-year. Our team knows how to overcome the lack of recruiting exposure you are receiving. We’ve done it before, and we’ll do it again!

Handling Scholarship Offers

All recruits should know how to handle scholarship offers. Just because a recruit has scholarship offers does not guarantee scholarship money. Too many recruits are losing scholarship leads and offers because they are not educated on how to maintain the offer.

Navigating College Scholarship Offers

Most every athlete, and parent for that matter, wants to get a full-ride scholarship when seeking college scholarship opportunities. The goal should be to get the most possible money from the coach and university. It’s very important that an athlete ask the right questions when making the decision on which school to attend, especially if there is money on the table.

What College Coaches Say About Recruiting

RecruitLook Scouts speak with college coaches all the time, and we have put together some quotes that coaches have made regarding the college recruiting process. You might be surprised!

How to Build Your College Recruiting Brand

High school athletes need to focus on building their recruiting brand during the college recruiting process. There are millions of athletes fighting for scholarship dollars, and to get any of that money, athletes need to stand out from the crowd. Athletes need to gain a competitive edge, and this section uncovers some secrets to get more recruiting exposure.

WHY SHOULD AN ATHLETE BLOG?

If an athlete is relying on their talent to do the recruiting for them, then they run the risk of never being discovered. With an abundant amount of media outlets vying for recruiting coverage, college coaches/recruiting coordinators are using the internet to search for athletes. Coaches will search for certain recruiting needs, or they could be searching the internet to learn more about certain recruits. Furthermore, to answer the question as to why an athlete should be blogging on RecruitLook…RecruitLook ranks highest amongst keywords than their competitors.

BLOGGING IS A GREAT WAY FOR HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES TO GET MORE COLLEGE RECRUITING EXPOSURE.

One important thing to keep in mind when it comes to the college recruiting process is: What do coaches know about you, and how can you get that info in front of them?

A simple answer is to have a personal blog. A blog is a great way to share your experiences during your high school career. Blogging will give college coaches an easier way to find and learn more about you.

Every RecruitLook athlete has their own personal blog on their recruiting profile…for free! College coaches live a very busy lifestyle, and it is difficult for them to keep up with all their possible recruits. RecruitLook helps to bridge that gap with athlete blogs! College coaches can read athlete blogs for quick, real-time information on their potential recruits. The same thing applies to athletes. Athletes can now share their achievements with the coaches recruiting them as well as coaches that are yet to discover them.

Searching Blogs

RecruitLook blogs are ranking high on Google search with a good amount of those blogs landing on the first page of Google just days after their post date. Let’s take a look at two different examples.

Blog Title: Jayson Tatum Recruiting

This was a blog about one of the best high school basketball recruits in the entire 2016 recruiting class. Jayson has thousands of articles and web mentions on the internet. Within 2 days after posting the blog, it appeared first page Google and #6 overall. The only sites that ranked higher for Jayson Tatum Recruiting search were ESPN, Rivals Network Sites, and Yahoo Sports. This is valuable for athletes that are landing on college coaches’ radars. A coach will find your blog immediately after searching Google. Then they can start to read about you and further evaluate you. Look at the photo below:

Jayson Tatum

Blog Title: Top Long-Snapper for 2014

This blog was written by a RecruitLook member trying to get more college recruiting exposure. RecruitLook Scouts advised him to blog about all his recent accolades at a position (long-snapping) that is difficult to get recruiting attention for. This was a strategy that has paid off. His recruiting has picked up significantly with a blog with the above-mentioned title. College coaches in need of a 2014 long-snapper are finding him through his RecruitLook blog. If you search for anything with keywords pertaining to ‘2014 Long-Snappers’ then you’ll see his blog. His blog ranks 4th overall on Google search just days after posting it. The blog shows up behind 2 nationally renowned long-snapping schools, and it appears before 24/7 Sports, ESPN, and Youtube clips for long-snapping. See the picture below:

top long-snapper

RecruitLook Profiles

RecruitLook blogs will appear in two locations for the athlete. One is on the RecruitLook homepage, and the other is on their Recruiting Profile. This gives coaches a direct spot to access athlete blogs, and more recruiting exposure for athletes when the blogs are on the RecruitLook homepage.

Blog Location: RecruitLook Homepage

Top blogs will be promoted on the RecruitLook homepage on the featured blog section. The 2 main scrollers in the large boxes, and the mini-scroller along the right side of the page. This is a great chance for athletes to get their blog posts read by college coaches and fans!

Blogs on RecruitLook Homepage

Blog Location: Athlete's Recruiting Profile

Blog posts will also appear on the athlete’s recruiting profile. This is very important for student-athletes that are trying to get recruited. The more that athletes are blogging about how wonderful they are, the more college coaches can learn about them. College coaches are doing as much research as possible on new recruits, so having a location on a recruiting profile that can give the coaches important information is paramount. Below is a screenshot of where each blog will appear on a recruit’s profile.

Athlete's Recruiting Profile

What Athletes Should Blog About for More Recruiting Exposure

Blogs need to focus on topics that will increase your recruiting potential. Don’t blog about what you had to eat that day or about your summer vacation trip. College coaches do not need or want to know that information. You should be blogging about topics that a college coach will be interested in.

How Athletes Should Maximize Blogs for Search Engine Rankings

It is very important that you blog, and it is just as important that you label your blog properly. In order to rank higher in Google, you’ll need to have your blog titled properly. The blogs mentioned earlier in this post were able to rank highly in a short time because they were titled properly. If the long-snapping blog was titled “I’m a long-snapper” then Google probably wouldn’t have ranked it; however, since it was labeled with what people are searching Google for, it was able to rank first page.

Social media has vastly changed the landscape of college recruiting. Student-athletes and parents can use this section to educate themselves on how to utilize social media for college recruiting exposure.

Earning a full-ride athletic scholarship is every high school athlete’s dream. Trying to get to that point of receiving offers is the challenge most athletes face today. There are several factors that athletes should consider when trying to get noticed. Here are some sports recruiting tips that will help you during the recruiting process.

Social Media in Recruiting

With the popularity of social platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, high school recruits are more under the microscope than ever before. Social media isn’t going anywhere, so athletes better become familiar with how to use it.

Twitter Costing Scholarships

High school athletes can lose out on a scholarship with a 140-character tweet! It has happened before and will continue to happen. What is costing athletes scholarships?

Social Media Advice

There are a few things every athlete should do to protect themselves on social media. These simple steps could be the difference on a scholarship offer or not.

Twitter Tips for Athletes

Twitter can definitely help an athlete land a scholarship just as easy as it can cost a scholarship. Read these tips from the RecruitLook team on how to use Twitter for your college recruitment.

Facebook Tips for Athletes

Facebook can definitely help an athlete land a scholarship just as easy as it can cost a scholarship. Read these tips from the RecruitLook team on how to use Facebook for your college recruitment.

Instagram Tips for Athletes

Instagram can definitely help an athlete land a scholarship just as easy as it can cost a scholarship. Read these tips from the RecruitLook team on how to use Instagram for your college recruitment.